Jason Behr Interviews & AOL Chats




Jason Behr - Max Evans

I don't have the dates of all the articles, but I tried to put them in roughly the correct order based on content.
(I wasn't always great with saving sources. If I know where and when the article came from it is listed)

Here is a list of the articles and interviews below
Click a title to jump to the article













JASON BEHR - EPK, SEASON 1
(these were short promotional interviews for season 1)

"Since the pilot, Max has sort of come out of his shell a little more than he was ever able to.  He's experienced a little more of what life has to offer.  His relationship with Liz has progressed some and not without consequence.  And I think also that the three aliens, Max, Isabel and Michael, have come closer and closer to finding out the truth about their past.

"Michael sort of drags everyone along with him on this visionquest and Max tries to be the calm one but I think somewhere inside him he wants to know too.  But his life, along with Isabel's life, in Roswell is a little more sane than Michael's.  So you have three different levels of desire to find out this truth; Isabel wants to find out because she wants to know where she's from but she still likes her life in Roswell, she loves her parents, she likes school; Max is torn because he has Liz and then he has this truth out there that they're getting closer and closer to, so there's three different levels of want and desire to find out where they're really from."

"I think it's a unique blend of both the fantasy and the metaphor and the humour and the drama involved with the show.  I think that we can't have too much of one thing.  It's not a comedy and it's not an incredibly serious drama where everything's always down.  We try to add different flavours of things.  In one week you'll have something that's more suspense-driven, and we kinda find out more about our past and the history and the truth to their origins, and then in some shows you'll have more emotional character-driven stories."

"We had a wonderful experience in the pilot.  Jason [Katims] is incredibly talented.  He's got this brilliant mind that's always constantly working.  You can see him when he's moving on the set, and he's just kind of bouncing around looking and constantly thinking.  And the characters are so rich and the ideas and the possibilities are infinite, with the backdrop of being an alternate reality if you will, of the existence of aliens.  That backdrop, coupled with his knack for relationships and then also with David Nutter's eye, it's just...it's been one great experience.

"I think that for me to sit here and tell you that we're the only intelligent lifeforms in this galaxy would be very arrogant of me."












The Art of Being Jason Behr, WB.com - unknown date

My best friend:
"My dog, an Akita, is named Ronin. His name comes from a dark comic book I read as a kid."

Not-so-tall tale:
"Back in junior high school, I looked just like Mini-Me. I came up to the shoulders of all my friends."

My alter ego's day job:
"I drove a stock car once up at California Speedway. There's something about the fact that you're that close to death that I really like."

My dream car:
"A Porsche. The Germans make great cars."

Desert island must-have:
"Krispy Kreme doughnuts. Nothing beats the original Krispy Kreme."

Unidentified foreign objections:
"Until there is tangible evidence that aliens exist, it's still up for debate."

On the good (working) life:
"Whether I am on the sand on a beach in Tahiti or in downtown Los Angeles working in the middle of the night, I am happy. As long as I'm acting, that's the most important thing: to be able to find a really good story and tell it the best way I can."










Jason Behr Interview (In Style Magazine) 1999

Age: "Twenty-five. The best thing about it is that my car insurance got cheaper."

Sign: "I'm a Capricorn. They're boring--supposedly hard workers and good with numbers. I completely disagree because I've never been good with math."

Top Three Passions: "Basketball, my family and Krispy Kreme doughnuts. Nothing beats the original Krispy Kreme."

Always in his Fridge: "Orange juice, water, leftover pizza and beer."

Splurges: "I'll spend a lot of money on a good dinner, but also love stuff--buying technology stuff like a TV or a DVD player."

Daily Uniform: "Jeans, T-shirt, boxers and work boots."

On Playing a Teen: "It's the Peter Pan in me. I don't think I'll ever grow up."

Alien Encounters: "It would be presumptous of me to tell you that we are the only intelligent life form that ever existed. I thought my high school principal was an alien. He was so bland."

Superpowers Wish List: "I'd like to be able to travel anywhere in an instant. Cancun is the only place I've ever visited outside America."

Next Vacation Spot: "I'll probably go back home to Minneapolis."










It List E.T. JASON BEHR - Entertainment Weekly - June 25, 1999

AGE 25

WHY HIM? As an out-of-this-world hottie in the promising WB drama Roswell, Behr gives new meaning to the term "teen alienation."

CREATIVE CRUTCH "Coffee. Black. Lots of it."

WANTS TO WORK WITH Susan Sarandon, Anthony Hopkins.

IF HE COULDN'T ACT HE'D... "Paint. I'm an aspiring Picasso." NEXT Roswell bows this fall.










Jason Behr Article (Seventeen - October 1999)

Hard-core Dawson's Creek fans aren't likely to forget Jason Behr as cocky Chris Wolfe, who seduced and then dumped Jen. But this season Behr, 25, sheds the bad-boy act to play Max Evans, an alien survivor in the new WB drama Roswell, based on a legendary UFO crash that took place 50 years ago.

Will wee see any spillover from Chris' character in Max? Absolutely nothing from Chris Wolfe is related to Max. Max is the good guy.

Did you research extraterrestrial life for the part? I read a lot of books and watched documentaries and movies about Roswell. I'm also a big X-Files fan.

Do you believe in aliens? It would be arrogant of me to think that we are the only intelligent life form that exists.

Ever had an encounter? Not that I recall, but I saw E.T. about 12 times.










Jason Behr
Alien Angst
By: DORRIE CROCKETT
Why We're Watching: What teen hasn't felt like an alien?
To see original article go to http://www.pathfinder.com/people/sp/falltv/behr.html

Teen angst-o-rama is the WB's specialty, and this season's entry doesn't disappoint. In Roswell, the latest twist on the dark side that is high school, Jason Behr plays Max Evans, a descendent of the original Roswell, N.M. "visitors" of yore. Yup, he's an alien.

Behr is no stranger to the network's demo: last year he had a six-episode stint as rich boy jerk Chris Wolfe on Dawson's Creek. He's guested on 7th Heaven and Buffy, the Vampire Slayer (as our heroine's bad news ex-boyfriend from L.A.). Behr is also a veteran of the ill-fated 1998 jock soap Push, in which he played jealous track star Dempsey Easton.

Will The X-Files-Goes-to- High-School make it on an already teen- glutted net? Well, a post- Dawson's time slot should help. As will the central romance in the series, an alien/human pairing that gives new meaning to the words "star-crossed." Throw in a suspicious sheriff and the living hell high school is for outsiders, and Roswell's ratings could well be out of this world.










Viewer alienation not a problem for teen drama 'Roswell'
From Laurin Sydney CNN Entertainment News Correspondent
NEW YORK (CNN) - Oct 14, 1999

High-school years are often filled with feelings of alienation, of not belonging, of almost like being from another planet. That's exactly what the creators of "Roswell" are banking on. On the new WB drama, aliens walk the halls of a Roswell, New Mexico, high school. They carry backpacks and gossip. In fact, these aliens look better and talk smarter than any high-school students from any known galaxy. It was some 30 or 40 miles northwest of Roswell that conspiracy buffs say an alien spacecraft crashed in July 1947. Tales of coverups by the United States military have since proved as hardy as cacti in the desert terrain. Among the most persistent allegations is that the remains of downed aliens were taken to a facility called Hangar 18 at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (then known as Wright Field) near Dayton, Ohio. Originally, Army Air Corps personnel from the 509th Bomb Group are said to have referred to a crashed "flying disk." The term used shortly thereafter by the military was "weather balloon." Washington for more than 50 years has been dogged by questions about the "Roswell incident." And the southwestern town today has a tourist industry thriving on the subject and centered around such installations as the International UFO Museum & Research Center. The producers of the WB's new show -- David Nutter of "The X-Files" and Jason Katims of "My So-Called Life" -- have layered onto the basic idea a new concept: The alien ship delivered an incubator containing three alien teens. It's those three kids who, in the pilot aired on October 6, found their cover blown when one of them revealed his identity to a friend, along with a power to adjust molecular structure and heal humans. Says Jason Behr , who plays that alien teen, Max, says the show is "about a bunch of high-school students and their friends and how they relate to each other and how they deal with the whole dynamic of that relationship when it's taken an unexpected turn."

A Romeo-and-Juliet tale That unexpected turn comes when one of Max's fellow students, Liz Parker (Shiri Appleby ) is shot while working at her father's diner, the Crashdown Cafe. Max heals her mortal wound with a touch of his hand, leaving behind a telltale silver handprint. Then he asks her not to reveal his secret. A relationship blooms between the guy from outer space and the girl whom Appleby describes as "very smart, into science, biology -- and she somewhat has a crush on this guy." All this, in spite of the strong disapproval of Max's two fellow stranded aliens, Isabel Evans (Katherine Heigl) and Michael Guerin (Brendan Fehr). They fear Max is putting them at risk by opening up to an Earthling girl. "I saw me as he saw me," Appleby's character says in the show, describing the brief interaction. "And the amazing thing was, in his eyes, I was beautiful." "It's kind of like a love story, it really is," says Behr. "But it's about two different people that shouldn't be together but want to." In one of the pilot's most pointed scenes, a Roswell festival, crawling with people costumed as "aliens," sends a mock spaceship on a wire to crash and burn on the ground. The three alien teens look on, made outsiders in the crowd by the fact that they're seeing a tawdry replay of their violent arrival on Earth.

Sky-high ratings, for WB "Roswell's" premiere posted the WB's second-highest debut ever, indicating that these two previously unknown actors, Behr and Appleby, may soon be household names. The sudden success feels alien to Behr, he says: "It's a weird feeling. I feel like I woke up in somebody else's bed." Appleby actually did wake up in somebody else's bed. Although anxious to know whether "Roswell" would be picked up and what time it would air, she was crashing at a friend's house so she wouldn't feel like she was waiting for the phone to ring. "So I woke up at 11:30," she says. "I'm like, 'I'm just going to check the machine; I know I don't have any messages, but I'm just going to check.' Checked, had three messages. They're like 'We've been picked up. Call for details.'" She'd later find out that the WB had ordered 22 episodes of the show, not just 13, and that it had landed in the coveted Wednesday night slot (9 p.m. Eastern) following "Dawson's Creek." "I didn't even know what to do," Appleby says. "It was unbelievable. It was like a dream come true."










"TV guide's 10 to watch: Jason Behr" - Nov 1999

ROLE: Brooding teenage alien Max Evans, on WB's Roswell

HOMETOWN: Minneapolis, Minnesota

AGE: 25

CREDITS: Guest roles on Dawson's Creek ('I started out as Michelle Williams's love interest, then my character ended up hanging around Capeside causing trouble'), Buffy the Vampire Slayer ('I came in as a friend [to Buffy[, but had an ulterior motive') and 7th Heaven. Also starred in the short-lived ABC series Push.

GIRLFRIEND: No

HOBBIES: Basketball, hiking in the mountains with his dog Ronin, an Akita.

JUST LIKE HIS CHARACTER: "The idea of still trying to find out who I am. I think that we all are."

NOT LIKE HIS CHARACTER: "He's under pressure to keep quiet. I'm sitting here telling you what my guilty pleasure is."

GUILTY PLEASURE: Cartoons

FAVORITE JUNK FOOD: Krispy Kreme doughnuts

FAVORITE MOVIE: "The Godfather"

FAVORITE BOOK: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

FAVORITE BAND: The Dave Matthews Band

FAVORITE CHILDHOOD TV SHOW: Tom and Jerry

MOST-WORN ARTICLE OF CLOTHING: Old black baseball hat

ACTOR WHO INSPIRES HIM: Paul Newman










Extraterrestrial (Entertainment Teen - December 1999)
The Roswell Hottie's E.T. Obsession Saves the Day

When it comes to aliens, Jason Behr, the star of the new WB serires, Roswell, is a believer. "For me to sit up here and tell you that we are the only intelligent life form that ever existed would be very arrogant..." Truth be told, as a child, the now 26-year-old actor was deeply affected by the movie, E.T. and loved any and all films that dealt with the subject of aliens. "...I think that the fantasy and the discovery of it all, and the idea behind the fact that there could be other intelligent life forms out there, is fascinating." he says.

And what can be more fascinating that playing the rold of the very thing that's intrigued him for, like forever? Jason is Roswell's Max Evans, a teenage relative of the aliens who, legend has it, landed in Roswell, New Mexico back in the '40's. While his human peers are coping with typical identity and self-esteem crises, Max, his sister and their friend are literally on a quest to find out who they are. Can Jason identify? Ina sense, he did the same when he left his Minneapolis, MN digs for Los Angeles, CA.

ON HIS WAY
Jason had performed in school plays throughout his childhood, but it was in high school that he became intent on making a career out of acting. In fact, as soon as he graduated, Jason packed his bags and moved to L.A. to see what he could accomplish.

In a town where publicity shots are used as coaster, and audition lines are as long as those that the DMV, Jason was able to score jobs immediately. Despite his instant success, however, there were some bumps in the road. Jason landed his first permanent TV role as Tyler Baker in the cable series, Sherman Oaks, but the show was soon cancelled. when the dark-haired charmer landed his next TV role in ABC's Push, it too met the same fate. Never-the-less, Jason sttod firm and landed a bit part in the Reese Witherspoon film, Pleasantville, and the independent film, Rites of Passage, and did guest appearances on Jag, Pacific Blue, Profiler, 7th Heaven, Cracker, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the show that put him in the ring with some of today's most talented young stars, Dawson's Creek. Jason played bad boy Chris Wolfe and most certainly got himself noticed.

Jason's persistence and E.T. connection gave him an extreme advantage when he met Roswell's producers, and before he knew it, the roll of Max became his. Which just goes to show, you just never know when one of your most favorite interests or hobbies will come in handy.










The Jason Part from Male Call - Dec 1999

Ahh, Max Evans--local alien next door and heartthrob extraordinare. And now that this cutie has found permanent placement in the WB show Roswell, he can finally hang his acting hat up momentarily on the network of all networks for hot teen drama.

After all, Behr had been jumping around from show to show making his flight from acting rookie to teen sensation for too long. In fact, we've seen him on a ton of programs since he made the trek out to Los Angeles from his native city of Minnesota.

If you are a real Behr-file, you might remember him from such episodic work in Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, Dawson's Creek, JAG as well as the leading role of Dempsey Easton in the ABC series Push.

The Dawson's role featured him as a know-it-all Chris Wolfe who pursued Jen only to leave her in less than 3 episodes. But television is not all this hottie is about. He also starred in the indie feature Rites of Passage which recently made its debut at the 1999 Palm Springs Film Festival.

How did he prepare for his new rold on Roswell, you ask? It was simple. "I watched E.T. about 12 times," he says. And although he calls Max "a good guy," we're not so sure we would want to date an alien--but then again, maybe we would if it was Jason Behr.










JASON BEHR THINKS STARRING ON 'ROSWELL' IS OUT OF THIS WORLD
New York Times, Dec 10, 1999
By: Ian Spelling

Jason Behr had a close encounter.

Well, sort of.

Driving to work a few months ago, the star of the WB hit sci-fi series Roswell experienced a sudden rush of fame and recognition. And it blew him away.

"I'd heard the rumors about Roswell billboards going up, about Roswell posters at bus stops and on buses,'' he says. "And all of those things had our faces on them. But I was coming to the studio at 6 or 8 in the morning and not leaving until 10 or 12 at night, so I wasn't getting a chance to go out and see much of anything. Even on weekends, most of my time was spent with family or friends, or by myself, just relaxing.

"Then I was on my way to work one time,'' he recalls, "and I was late, speeding through the streets. I didn't quite make a yellow light, so I stopped. I looked to my right, and I saw myself on a bus stop, staring back at me.''

Behr smiles broadly at the memory.

"It was a pretty bizarre and surreal moment,'' he says. "I was like, 'Wow!' After a minute I was able to really look at it, and it was tastefully done -- dramatic and dark and mysterious -- yet there was something very engaging about it.

"So that was the big moment,'' he says, "but I'd say it wasn't so much a defining moment as surreal. It was bizarre because, two years earlier, I was sitting at that bus stop.''

Sitting in his trailer on the Paramount lot after a long day of shooting Roswell, Behr's still full of energy and eager to chat.

The series casts him as Max Evans, and Katherine Heigl as Max's sister Isabel, with Brendan Fehr as their friend Michael. Max, Isabel and Michael are aliens residing in Roswell, N.M., and they're desperate to keep their identities a secret.

Recently, Max complicated matters by using his powers to save Liz (Shiri Appleby), a human teen he'd adored from afar. Max and Liz now share a special connection, but they don't dare act on their feelings for one another.

"We're still finding ourselves, but I think the show is good,'' Behr says. "Episodes like '285 South' and 'River Dog,' our two-parter, were really good. They had a nice mix of relationships, character studies and development.

"Those two episodes were . . . as close to what I envisioned Roswell to be as we've done so far. It's important to stay on that track, and when I talk to people who watch the show, they seem to feel . . . the same way.''

Behr has a knack for hooking up with popular shows. A native of Minneapolis, he counts among his credits guest spots on Dawson's Creek, 7th Heaven and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the latter in the popular episode "Lie to Me.'' But Roswell is his first stint as a series lead.

"I don't think it's ever quite how you picture it when you're thinking about it,'' he says. "This has been a lot of long hours, but it doesn't really seem like work because of the people I'm surrounded by every day.

"We've got a great cast, a great crew and great producers. The company I keep makes it fun and makes it a treat to be around here all the time.''

If Roswell sustains its popularity, Behr may remain in that company for the next several years. That possibility prompts the actor to contemplate the end of the series, specifically the last episode.

Do Max, Isabel and Michael return home? Get caught by Sheriff Valenti (William Sadler)? Figure out they're descendants of the aliens that crashed in Roswell in 1947, or that they actually are the Roswell aliens?

"I don't know,'' Behr says. "I don't have the answers, because there are so many other questions that remain unanswered. Are our parents back there? Are our parents alive? That would be a big factor in my decision to stay or go, assuming we're given a choice.

"Could Liz come with me? Would Liz want to go with me? Could I ever come back, or go back and forth between home and Earth?''

He pauses in thought.

"Dramatically, to make it a more weighty issue, it's probably got to be this or that -- I'll have to choose.

"Max can't have his cake and eat it, too.''










Jason Behr
Teen Celebrity, Jan/Feb 2000

Ahh, Max Evans--local alien next door and heartthrob extraordinare. And now that this cutie has found permanent placement in the WB show Roswell, he can finally hang his acting hat up momentarily on the network of all networks for hot teen drama. After all, Behr had been jumping around from show to show making his flight from acting rookie to teen sensation for too long. In fact, we've seen him on a ton of programs since he made the trek out to Los Angeles from his native city of Minnesota. If you are a real Behr-file, you might remember him from such episodic work in Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, Dawson's Creek, JAG as well as the leading role of Dempsey Easton in the ABC series Push. The Dawson's role featured him as a know-it-all Chris Wolfe who pursued Jen only to leave her in less than 3 episodes. But television is not all this hottie is about. He also starred in the indie feature Rites of Passage which recently made its debut at the 1999 Palm Springs Film Festival. How did he prepare for his new rold on Roswell, you ask? It was simple. "I watched E.T. about 12 times," he says. And although he calls Max "a good guy," we're not so sure we would want to date an alien--but then again, maybe we would if it was Jason Behr.










Jason Behr blasts off in 'Roswell,' new movie
CNN - March 13, 2000

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Jason Behr was making the guest rounds on various teen-angst shows on the WB -- from "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" to "Dawson's Creek" -- when it all changed.

Well, sort of.

He landed the lead in this season's teen alien-ation series "Roswell," a "My So Called Life"-meets-"X-Files" drama about fictional survivors of an alleged 1947 spacecraft crash.

"It does sound funny when you first try to explain it: three alien teen-agers going to high school," he says. "In the wrong hands it could have been a very bad Saturday morning special."

It wasn't. In fact, the show's success has landed the 26-year-old Behr among the WB's stable of young actors taking Hollywood by storm.

With a best acting nomination in this year's Santa Monica Film Festival for the yet-to-be-released independent "Rites of Passage," also starring Dean Stockwell, Behr reveals he can stand up alongside the best of young Hollywood. The film won best of show at the festival.

But unlike many of his colleagues, he's avoided the pitfalls of such exposure -- tabloids, paparazzi and public disputes. (Read: Jessica Biel's attempt to get out of her "7th Heaven" contract and the tabloid fare of the cast of "Charmed.")

'Wiser than his years'

Maybe, it isn't Behr's turn yet. More likely, says "Roswell" executive producer Jonathan Frakes, "he's got a good head on his shoulders."

"There's something wiser than his years there when you talk to him," Frakes said. "This business is a real privelege and real honor, and it's not something to be taken lightly. He gets that."

Sitting in a cubicle-sized dressing room recently on the lot of Paramount, Behr is modest about his success despite the attention he has received of late from critics, including being named among TV Guide's "10 To Watch."

"For people to tell you nice things or compliment you is rewarding, but if you allow yourself to buy into the notion you are now a star then you stop being an actor," he said.

Born and reared in the Minneapolis suburb of Richfield, Behr credits his stability to his upbringing by a single mother raising five kids.

His mother encouraged his acting from the time he could memorize lines.

"It started out as a hobby, something fun to do," Behr said. "My mother was always there, but never threw me into anything. Her attitude was always, 'Whatever you want to do, Jason.'"

At 19, Behr decided to make a go of it, hopping on an airplane with $200 in his pocket and a promised spot on a friend's couch.

"Major culture shock," he said. "People have a very different way of thinking out here. Not to say that it's better or worse. It's just different."

Cut off from his tight-knit family and old friends, the first couple of years were tough.

"I wished for a long time I could do this from Minneapolis," he said.

But slowly, his youthful appearance, dark good looks and talent helped land him guest spots on a variety of shows, and a role in the 1998 if-you-blinked-you-missed-it ABC drama "Push."

During that time, his family began a "mass exodus" to California, seduced by the warm weather.

Family makes the move to Golden State

"I can't tell you what it means to have them here -- the support," he said. "I'm in a very happy place in my life right now, and I want to share it with people who mean a lot to me."

These days he's more at home with friends and family than he is making public appearances, such as presenting at a recent music awards show with the Irish girl band Bewitched.

"Surreal," he says of the experience.

Actress Shiri Appleby, who plays Behr's love interest on the show, says the Midwestern charm "is not an act."

"That's really him. He's really a nice guy," she said. "He takes what he does seriously, but he doesn't take himself too seriously."

When "Roswell" was picked up for a full season, she and Behr were sent to New York to meet possible future advertisers.

"It was his first trip there and he lays on the floor of the limo, looking through the (roof) at all the buildings," Appleby said. "He wouldn't get up from the floor. He was so funny."

Behr is serious about his job.

His focus right now, he says, is the television show. While many actors are scrambling for projects to do on their hiatus, he's taking his time, considering several independent and studio movie offers.

"You don't have to take the first thing to be successful. There are a lot of people who want you to keep doing the same thing, like that saying, 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it,"' Behr said. "I want to be involved in telling a good story. ... If I fail because of that, I failed my way. If I succeed, it's going to be that much more rewarding."










Jason Behr article (MovieLine Magazine - april 2000)
--Conducted by Daniel Guss

"Roswell's star JASON BEHR crashes at a small bachelor pad that's perfect for a few guys, a few DVDs and a pizza."

Jason Behr's one-bedroom apartment in Burbank is only a short drive from the soundstage on the Paramount backlot where he plays Max, the heartthrob teenage alien in love with human waitress, on the hit TV series "Roswell." After a lenthy day on the set, the 26-year old Behr tends to rush straight home to plan his entertainment for the evening. Should he drive over the hill to the Viper Room on the Strip? Line up pals to shoot pool with at Q's in West L.A.? Neither. He'd rather invite some guys over to kick back at his place with a pizza and any of the dozens of mives in his expanding DVD collection. "Movies, for me, usually mean a bunch of my buddies and a stack of pizza boxes from Mulberry Street Pizzeria," Behr says. "We try to create as much of a theater atmosphere a possible, so we turn the house lights out." Laughing, he adds, "Sometimes we even spill Coke and spread out Jujubes for authenticity." Behr's "all snacks all the time" entertaining style meshes perfectly with his comfortable, very modest digs in which he's got a bulletin board littered with Blockbuster coupons and a healthy supply of (as-yet-unopened) Dom Perignon bottles (grateful offerings from WB execs?). The actor plans to move somewhere more spacious soon. "But for now, "he says while carefully positioning his shiatsu messager equipped black leather recliner in front of his entertainment center, "this setup works just fine for me." In front of him a Sony DVP $7700 DVD player coupled with a Sony Triniton KV 20S40 20-inch TV and a Sony SLV-679HF VCR stands ready.

So what's on Behr's marquee tonight? Well, his collection includes alienated Gen X fare (Trainspotting and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels), some comedies (both Austin Powers), some sci fi (The Matrix, Star Wars) and a scare flick (Disturbing Behavior, which was directed by "Roswell's co-creator, David Nutter). But Behr's real enthusiasm is for intense films like Taxi Driver, GoodFellas, Scarface, Seven, The Godfather and A Clockwork Orange.

Behr, who arrived from Minnesota just a few years ago, has noticed that his perspective on certain films has changed as his tenure in L.A. has lengthened. "I saw Robert Altman's The Player when I first came to L.A. Back then, I didn't get a lot of the insider nuances. I watched it again six months ago on DVD and had an entirely different impression of it. Now it's, like, Wow! I love how the openingscene is one long shot. Someone told me it's a homage to Hitchcock's Rope. That's the kind of movie that gets better each time you see it."

Having never gone to film school, or college for that matter, Behr is educating himself about the classics at home. He owns 1956's Giant, 1958's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and 1967's Cool Hand Luke. He also owns much of the Spielberg oeuvre, from Jaws to Saving Private Ryan. "I'm really getting into DVDs," says Behr. "The extra information they offer does it for me, especially the documentary and director commentary parts. I love knowing why a scene was set up in a particular way. And why this actor moved to a certain position." Take Martin Scorsese's cold-blooded 1976 classic, for instance: "On the Taxi Driver DVD, Scorsese explains why he set up certain scenes in particular ways, and I also learned how Jodie Foster prior to shooting. You get so much more out of movies when you get inside the director's and actors' heads."

When Behr is inspecting films this close up, he tednds to limit his company to only the most appreciative movie aficionados. "I watch with my Akita, Ronin," he says. "By the way, I adopted him long before Robert De Niro made his movie of the same name!"










Behr Essentials
Jason Behr Dreamwatch Interview - April 2000

Jason Behr is being kept very busy. Filming the eighteenth episode of his new series, Roswell High, under the direction of executive producer Jonathan Frakes, he appears in virtually every scene, which means that he should value every free moment he gets. Instead, he's sitting cross-legged on an easy chair in a side room off the soundstage at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, chatting easily about his new role.

The twenty-six year old veteran of over 75 commercials, numerous stage performances, and TV guest appearance, including a major stint in teen angst drama Dawson's Creek, is clearly having a great time. He stars as Max Evans, outwardly a normal teenage boy, who hides a mysterious secret -- along with his sister Isabel and friend Mike, Max is a survivor of the alien spacecraft which crashed in the desert near Roswell, New Mexico, in 1947. When he saves the life of human teenage Liz Parker, Max chooses to share his secret with her, just as other people are starting to become suspicious and their love affair unfolds alongside the drama of the pursuit of the aliens.

You've done an extensive number of guest roles in very popular shows on television. How did you feel when you found out that you'd got a lead in a new pilot?

I found out about Roswell when I was in North Carolina shooting Dawson's Creek. The script came my way via the normal channels. When I first read it, I thought, 'Here's a great idea'. There's a lot of teenage shows out there right now, but this one definitely separates itself from others because of this science fiction spin to it. What I immediately responded to was the characters and the story, but initially I thought in the wrong hands it could be done either very well or very badly. After I found out about [executive producer] David Nutter being involved, and [producer] Jason Katims being involved and Jonathan Frakes being involved, I knew that we were in very good hands, so there was no decision to be made. I felt I really wanted to be a part of it.

How do you feel now that it looks as it it's going to be a resounding success?
It's been pretty amazing. The response has been wonderful. People have really responded well to the show, and that's been very rewarding for everybody on the set. You work really hard, put a lot of long hours into it and you just really want to tell a good story, and the response has been very nice. It's a great feeling. It's a bit surreal at times.

Are you getting much chance to pursue your other interests outside acting, such as sports?
I'm a big basketball fan. There are actually two nets here on the lot, and every now and then you can get a good pic-up game in the gym, but they don't really want you to do too much physical activity, especially when you're at work here. 'Stay in your make-up. Stay in your trailer. Don't sweat anything off, and above all other things, don't hurt yourself.' When I get time, I play basketball. I spend a good amount of time with my family. I don't have that much free time. We're either on stage here or on location, so the free time I do have I like spending with my family and my friends... and catching up on sleep lost.

You've had a chance to do independent movies, working with people like Dean Stockwell. Did you enjoy the experience?
I had a great time on Rites of Passage. We shot that film in 21 days. It was real tight. A lot of emotional, long, character-driven scenes, just a lot of dialogue. A lot of night scenes, so for about three weeks I spent a good part of my life in the dark, which took a little bit of time getting used to, but once I acclimated to that schedule, it was fine. I didn't mind living like a vampire. The movie itself is a testament to what you can do if you really are passionate about something. Everyone worked really hard on that in a short amount of time to really make a good film. Working with Dean was great. He's the consummate professional. Always knew his lines, hit his mark, walking backwards blindfolded. He was just incredibly well oiled -- he knew exactly what he was doing. He's a damn good actor too, so I had a great time working with him. Victor Salva directed and wrote it. I found out earlier today, it's doing the festival circuit now, and it won the Grand Jury Prize at the Santa Monica film festival, so that was kind of cool. It's nice -- the icing on the cake.

Would you want to work on something outside the studio grind during the hiatus?
In a perfect world, I'd be on the beach of Tahiti, doing some kind of movie, but I don't thing that is going to happen. For me, it's not about where I'm shooting. First of all it's about the story. For me it's all about telling a good story, an interesting story. Something that whether or not you agree or disagree with what it's trying to say, it provokes thought that some type of emotion. (Hopefully it's positive. You can't presume on the story.) Secondly, it's the people I'm working with. I want to work with people that I respect, that I find interesting or intriguing, because you're going to be spending a vast amount of time with these people and you want to make the most of it. Location doesn't mean that much to me. It would be great if I could spend every day in the sun sitting on the sand on a beach in Tahiti, but if it's in the middle of the night in a studio in Los Angeles downtown somewhere, it doesn't matter to me. The most important thing is to find a really good story and tell it the best way that I can.

You've done a lot of diverse work. Is there anything that specifically stands out that you're proudest of?
Generally, I've been really lucky with the people that I've worked with. I don't have any really big horror stories. I think that Roswell is by far the best thing that I've been involved with. It's just been one wild ride! But it's been great for me, just wonderful all around. I'm working with a great group of actors, a great crew, and the producers. We have such a great opportunity to tell a really interesting story, and given that we're on The WB here, they allow Katims a certain freedom to do what he feels is right. The fact that they gave us 22 episodes meant we were able to spin a web in a way that we didn't have to worry about thinking 'we can only do six, we've got to give all this information right now'. It's not that we're telling a very slow story, it's just it's developing at a pace, not too quick and not too slow. I think that Roswell is so far probably the best thing I've done.

From what we've seen up to now, there's a very definite shape to the season. Have you had any input into the storylining, apart from moulding the characters? Or was it set when you came in?
Oh no. One of the great things about Jason Katims is that he's very very open to your input. I think that he understands that an actor, especially in a series, puts in a lot of time in the character, and eventually knows more about the character than anybody else including him, because they've only got one character to worry about. He's got eight characters to facilitate, and then on top of that, he has to worry about the storyline -- the A story, the B story -- and then the overall arc of the season and production. He's got a lot of things to worry about. So he's very open to people suggesting thigns to him. If it works, great. If it doesn't I'm sure he has a good reason for it. Here it's been a very collaborative effort on everyone's part.

Were there surprises for you when you picked up the scripts, did you think, 'I didn't see that coming'?
Some things. I can't give away too much information, but some things that will come about here towards the end of the season. . . We're allowed another creative freedom, in that we're not telling a story just about human nature. We're not confined to those rules. We've got alien nature here. We can do whatever we want -- pretty much. How do we know something can't happen? There were certain things that I used to think, 'God that would be so cool, but will the network allow this, will the studio allow this, is that acceptable to the masses out there?' And some of the things I didn't think were going to happen are, but it's told in such a way that you understand. It's not this, 'we thought it was this, but it's completely different in alien nature'. There are things that will surprise you because they surprised me. I put in a lot of work trying to figure out the possibilities - what can we do here? Do we know how long we live? Could we wither away and die tomorrow? How do we know at some point that we don't completely change into something else? A cocoon-like state? Who knows? There are so many things out there, so many question marks and no answers, but I think the ending of the season will be enlightening for a lot of people. . .

Do you have any thoughts about the possibility of extra-terrestrial life?
Are we alone? Who knows? I guess the answer is that we don't have an answer. It's still a question. It's a big sky out there. If you look up at night, you realize how insignificant we all are in the grand scheme of things. We have no idea what's out there, and we won't know until we have absolute tangible proof. If everybody adhered to the popular rational thought of that time, then we'd be having this conversation with two tin cups and a very long string. You have to believe in something without really having any tangible evidence. You have to have faith without proof. You have to believe in something and I think we have to remain open minded in our lives or else we aren't going to move forward.

Did you look into any of the background material about what really happened in Roswell in 1947?
I watched this great video, hosted by Jonathan Frakes, called Alien Autopsy [the supposed autopsy of the alien creature found at Roswell]. I was so captivated I had to watch it five, six, ten times! He didn't know I'd watched it; I told him and he just gave a chuckle. It was part of my research, yeah. I wanted to get a general sense of what was the overall thought about Roswell, the overall conspiracy of this 1947 crash and what it was like for the people growing up in that town to have that as part of their everyday life. Are they destined by it? Are they making money out of it? Are they completely sick of it -- or are they interested? Are they really believers? Just the idea of what it would be like being a teenager growing up in that town, so I did a lot of research on all the theories, all those books, the Alien Autopsy, to make me more informed.

Did you look at the original book series?
Yes, I read those as well, and we have definitely taken a different direction since that. the overall concept, the general idea is still there, but we've deviated form the books.

What about your own future? Do you see yourself staying this side of the camera? Would you like to direct or write?
Absolutely, I write now, and take my camcorder out whenever I can. I ask questions all the time of our director of photography, our camera operator. I try to talk to the directors as much as possible to try to get an idea where they're coming from. I know every actor says they want to direct. . . well, some don't, I guess, but there are a lot out there. At some point yes, it would be wonderful to have that opportunity.










Jason Behr Copes With Teenage Alienation - April 2000 By Len P. Feldman from gist.com

Most aliens in sci-fi dramas come from outer space. But one alien on WB's new series, Roswell, came from Dawson's Creek: Jason Behr, who Creek fans know from his recurring role as rich brat Chris Wolfe. "I'm pretty much out of the Creek," says Behr.

The 25-year-old actor has a new home on Roswell playing the ultimate alienated teenager, Max Evans, a descendant of the extraterrestrials who supposedly crash-landed at Area 51 in Roswell, NM, in 1947. With his otherworldly heritage, Max has more trouble adjusting to high school than most kids his age. Behr can relate: "I think going through high school was the most confused I was in life. That's when I felt most like I was on the outside looking in."

Though he's definitely human, Behr had his own high-school handicap to overcome. "I was like Mini-Me," he jokes. "I was, like, 4-foot-11 in the eighth grade. I was 5-foot-2 in the ninth grade. I came up to the shoulders of all my friends. It was really hard playing basketball with them."

Now, at just a bit under 6 feet, the Minneapolis native seems pretty confident playing the out-of-this-world boyfriend of very pretty human Liz Parker (Shiri Appleby). Unlike some actors who insist they can play a convincing love scene with someone they hate, Behr, who claims to have a natural rapport with Appleby, feels a friendly chemistry is essential. "I mean, there's only so far that the acting can take you if you're looking into someone's eyes and you don't want to be in their presence," he says.

In addition to playing opposite hottie Appleby, Behr has to drink some pretty hot stuff for the role: Apparently Tabasco sauce aids in the aliens' digestion of human food.

Behr and the other Roswell aliens, Katherine Heigl (who plays Max's sister Isabel) and Brendan Fehr (who portrays their friend Michael) ingest a water-tomato paste mixture onscreen instead of Tabasco. But Behr says at first he and Fehr "tried to do the manly thing and use straight Tabasco sauce." The experiment was an explosive failure. "We must have pumped about a half a cup of Tabasco into our Diet Cokes, and we both wanted to rush to the bathroom and throw up."

Aside from exciting alien intrigue and interspecies relationships, Roswell also features the aliens making pretty cool use of their otherworldly powers, like listening to CDs by holding them up to their ears. What would Behr do if he had such powers? "I would make myself 6-foot-6 or 7 feet tall and go out and play some real basketball with the NBA stars," he says. Hmmm... maybe Behr's not quite over that height thing yet.










Jason Behr is from here and There
Published Monday, April 10, 2000
Neal Justin / Star Tribune - April 10, 2000

LOS ANGELES -- Jason Behr claims to be from the Twin Cities, but the evidence suggests that he's from Out There. The first clue: He plays an alien on "Roswell," a teenage version of "The X-Files," which moves to a new time slot tonight. Secondly, Behr doesn't act like the rest of the WB network's all-too-earthy stars.

"Felicity" fills a cassette tape blabbering about what she had for breakfast. "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" throws out as many one-liners as karate kicks. The "Dawson's Creek" gang can't talk about the weather without showing off their SAT vocabulary.

Behr keeps quiet. On the premiere episode of "Roswell" in October, his character, an alien disguised as a high school wallflower, responds to a shooting in a diner by rushing to the side of a comely classmate, putting his hand over her fatal wound until it evaporates and then darting out the door, barely saying more than a few urgent whispers. Since then, he still hasn't opened his mouth much.

Behr most likely comes from the planet of the strong, silent types, but while his peers have slipped into the skins of such rugged he-men as Gary Cooper and Robert Mitchum, Behr chose a body so skinny he could hide behind Calista Flockhart, along with a personality so tender that it makes young hearts swoon. When "Roswell" shot some outdoor scenes recently in a remote suburb of Los Angeles, nearly 75 teenage girls camped out until 2 a.m., primarily to catch a glimpse of Behr.

"He's got a mysterious quality that girls find sexy," said Carissa Rosenberg, entertainment editor for CosmoGIRL!, a new magazine aimed at teenage girls, which selected Behr as one of the nine hottest guys of 2000.

He's so together!

Katherine Heigl, who plays fellow alien Isabel on "Roswell," said young people are hungry for a leading man who manages to keep it together, despite having the weight of the world on his shoulders.

"He portrays a teenager who isn't just focused on girlfriends or football or whatever," she said. "He's a person who has to hold things together and be the strong one. There are a lot of young people who have had really tough situations and grow up really quickly and take a burden onto themselves. It's good they're finally putting that on TV, because a lot of people can relate to it. Not everyone is soda pop and malls."

Behr can be quite serious off screen, as well. He'll contemplate questions for hours, even months, in an effort to give you thoughtful, honest answers. I first met Behr nearly two years ago, and on a four-hour set visit this winter, he was still mulling over snippets of our first conversation.

Sitting in his dressing room during a break, he ignored his catered lunch to focus on his Camel Lights and the idea of an introverted young star.

Behr, 26, believes that most TV teens are robust and super-articulate, which isn't very realistic. "Not everyone is good at saying what's on their mind, and we see too much of that," he said. "It's idealizing what a teenager is, and I don't think it's the truth."

Outer space, inner space

Behr and his character share the desire to keep their private lives guarded. He lived in eight cities, primarily in Arizona and Minnesota, before his restless father left the family when Behr was quite young. His mother raised her five children in Minneapolis. He doesn't like to talk about his father and is not in touch with him.

"He was the catalyst for moving the family cross-country," he said. "I don't know what he was running from, but I think finally he realized it was responsibility."

His first memory: wading into some water, showing off to his mother, when suddenly a wave washed over him. "Maybe that's why I'm always watching my back -- or I'm just aware of what's behind me," he said.

He moved to Los Angeles at age 20 and struggled to find work for years, paying the bills by waiting tables and doing nearly 75 commercials. In 1998, he got a starring role in the ABC series "Push," a drama about Olympic hopefuls that failed to score with critics or viewers. It was his guest-star work on such WB shows as "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "Dawson's Creek" and "7th Heaven" that made him the prime candidate to headline his own show on the network.

"He's a professional," said "Roswell" co-star Brendan Fehr. "Even when he doesn't like something, he goes about it in a very diplomatic way. . . . There's this old kind of soul to him."

Behr still is capable of displaying a youthful, even goofball, side. When he visits the Twin Cities, about twice a year, he loves to pig out at a 24-hour diner and root hard for the Vikings.

While shooting a scene involving a game of Monopoly, Behr played with a lollipop between takes, even putting on a ventriloquism act with the stick. Co-stars say Behr has a rubbery, comical face, one that he uses to great effect for an imitation from "Rebel Without A Cause." Appropriately enough, he doesn't portray extroverted brooder James Dean, but rather a freaked-out Natalie Wood.

Behr is careful about his off-screen behavior and his choices of friends. His career is most certainly on the rise and he's wary about those who may be part of his inner circle.

"Roswell," which looked like a sure-fire hit at the start of the season, has faltered in recent months, but there's still a strong chance that it will return next year. If it is canceled, Behr would appear to have opportunities in feature films. After a blink-and-you'll-miss-'em role in "Pleasantville," he got a starring role in "Rites of Passage," a yet-to-be-released feature that earned him a best-acting nomination at the Santa Monica Film Festival.

"It's a real important time for me right now to surround myself with people that I trust and that I care about and, hopefully, that care about me," he said. "It's a weird line to walk. You don't want to put up walls and you don't want to alienate anybody -- no pun intended -- but you have to be aware; you have to be careful, or it will eat you alive."










ROSWELL: The Behr Necessities
An interview with TV`s alienated teen Jason Behr.
Author: Edward Gross
Date: April 10, 2000
Source: fandom.com

In the midst of all the press generated by a shift to Monday nights (beginning tonight) from Wednesday, plus the tobacco-mailing campaign to save the show, actor Jason Behr, who plays alien high school student Max Evans on the WB's ROSWELL, admits he is stunned by the sheer number of websites devoted to the show in general and to him in particular. "I think it's a reflection of the hard work and dedication that everybody puts into the show," he says. "The Internet reaction is very flattering. It's not something you expect going into it, but the thing you have to remember is that the fans don't have to do it; they don't have to invest their time and energy to create these websites. But they do it because they're passionate about the show. It's very flattering and something that's very appreciated."

As is probably well known at this point, Behr's character, along with his sister Isabel (Katherine Heigl) and friend Michael (Brendan Fehr), is a descendent of the Roswell aliens that crashed on earth in 1947. For some time they've lived unobtrusively as humans, until Max uses his powers to heal Liz Parker (Shiri Appleby) after she's shot. Afterwards, suspicions are raised, and Sheriff Valenti (William Sadler) is determined to expose them for what they are. Also dramatically driving the series is the unrequited love between Max and Liz, and Michael's determination to learn where the aliens come from and how he can get back home.

"Executive producer Jason Katims is incredibly gifted," says Behr, "and he has a wonderful way of allowing characters to grow and evolve and change. All of these characters that we knew at the beginning of the season, without exception, have all changed and evolved in some way."

Behr considers this one of the capabilities of television when it's working the way it's supposed to. "I think television is a wonderful medium," he enthuses. "It allows you to do certain things that you could never do in a movie. And you have twenty-two episodes per year to tell the best story that you can. You have that same chance to let people learn something about the characters or about the show itself. Television is a constant moving force; there's no stopping it. But if you can stay on top of it, you can pretty much do anything."

Most enjoyable to him is the fact that Max has undergone a true evolution throughout the show's first season. "I think he's evolved in several ways," says Behr. "In the beginning, he was the conscience of the group-the thinker, the one who, before taking any action, thought of the different consequences of what they decided to do. Given their situation, every move they make is imperative to their survival and secret. So he was like the rock-the conscience, the one who tried to get everyone to do the right thing. I think he learned over the course of this year that he can't always take positions and always tell people what the right or wrong thing to do is. He has learned not to be as controlling as he was before, and allow people to make mistakes on their own and learn from them. The only problem with that is he's still kind of struggling with that attitude, because some of the mistakes other people might make could have serious consequences for everyone. Michael, for instance, wants so badly to find a way home, but to the other characters Roswell is home. He'll do whatever it takes and whatever it costs to do this. It's very hard for Max to get through to him and make Michael understand what he's doing could be dangerous for everyone involved. Yet everyone on the show has choices they have to make, but at what cost? So it's a real delicate thing where Max is still learning."

ROSWELL itself seems to be going through something of an evolution, particularly during the season's last six episodes as teen angst takes a back seat to a much heavier dose of sci-fi storytelling. "The change seems very natural to me," says Behr. "The truth is, they always throw curve balls at us; we never know what happening from one script to the next. Of course, I'm not sure if they don't know themselves or if they're keeping it a tight-bound secret-one of these FBI type 'Level Three, Need-to-Know' type things. Whatever the case, we learn what's happening to the characters on a weekly basis. Some things are a surprise, but some things are a natural evolution of the characters. That was up until the last part of the season. We're ending the year on such a high note. Everything that they've known to be true comes tumbling down around them. Their whole world is turned upside down. From that point on, nothing is as it seems. It's very exciting. These last six episodes really change the whole gamut of everybody's lives."

Like BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER, ROSWELL seems to be a "living" thing, constantly moving in different directions, and the shift from teen angst to sci-fi is fine with Behr. "I think the show has already made that move," he says. "I don't think it's just about that anymore, although it will always be there as far as I know. I'm sure that that relationship [between Max and Liz] will solidify and evolve into something else. So I think it will always be a part of it, but I don't think it will be the central focus of every episode. We've learned so much about these characters and how they feel about each other. Now we can take them and put them into new situations and gain new insight into them. In the last few episodes, everything they've been searching for and running from has been dealt with in one way or another, and they gain information that changes everything and keeps the show unique."

Behr, a native of Minnesota, discovered his love for acting at age five, when he appeared on local stages. He honed his skills during his school years, and upon high school graduation moved to Los Angeles to see if he could make his mark. He did so, appearing in a variety of series, including DAWSON'S CREEK and BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER. It was the latter (in season two's "Lie to Me") that prepared him for a high-quality creative television production that he would later find on ROSWELL. In that episode, Behr played an old friend of Buffy's who came visiting her at Sunnydale, trying to renew their friendship. In truth, he wants to hand her over to the vampires so that, in exchange, they'll make him a member of the undead and he will live forever-neatly avoiding the brain tumor that's growing in his head.

"BUFFY was great," he proclaims. "Joss Whedon is incredible, to say the least. It was my first foray into that genre, and it was such a collective effort with him. He was very open to suggestions, and working on what felt right or wrong about the character. And the character had a strong arc. He came is as an affable, non-threatening friend from another school, and ended up having ulterior motives that were not necessarily of the nicest kind. You didn't really understand what his motives were until the end when he let on that he had terminal brain cancer."

Which, it's pointed out, magically transformed the audience's feelings about the character. "Absolutely," he concurs. "Although you might not agree with what he's doing, or the choices he's made. But faced with that kind of problem, I don't know what anybody would do in that situation. You understood why he was doing what he was doing. He wasn't making a right choice, but you knew where he was coming from. That was a great character to play, and an interesting arc. I think the collective creative experience with Joss prepared me for what I am doing on ROSWELL. If an actor has a good script and a good director, he can do the best work that he's capable of doing."

According to numerous press reports, one of the reasons that ROSWELL appeals to the actor is that he's a true fan of science fiction films dealing with alien encounters. "I think the idea of aliens living among us is very appealing," he says. "If it was true, would they be accepted? Would they be ostracized? Would they be welcome or feared? I guess those kinds of questions would be asked of anyone we don't know. People are afraid of what they don't know and have to face that fear in order to deal with them and the situation."

But does he believe in extraterrestrial life? "I try and remain open-minded about it," Behr replies. "If people thought one way only and didn't allow themselves to expand their views and be open-minded about the possibility of things, we'd be having this conversation with two tin cups and a really long string. We would be stuck in the Dark Ages. We would not evolve. There are people out there who will tell you that there is no way there will ever be contact with alien life. Maybe they're right, but maybe they're wrong. There were people for many years who said there would be no way we could recreate human tissue, and now they can grow a new ear. If you told my grandfather that some day we would be able to walk on the moon, he would have laughed at you and probably called you crazy. There are certain schools of thought that only believe one thing. And if they don't remain open-minded about possibilities beyond what they know, then they're going to be lost. If anything, the show has done that for me. I always was open-minded, but dealing with this material has opened my mind up even more to the possibilities."

ROSWELL's future will probably be determined over the next six weeks, depending on how the show fares ratings-wise in its new timeslot. Behr and the rest of the show's creative staff feel confident about a second season pick-up. "I think we're all positive about it," he admits. "I think we all have a very good feeling with the way the season is ending. Everything in the last few shows is bigger, faster and stronger. Plus, we're all very positive about the move to Monday nights. I think the people that are loyal to the show on Wednesdays will watch the show on Monday, and we should get some new viewers as well. If we do come back, I think the way things have been going would be a fine way to continue-as long as there's a balance between a science fiction thriller and keeping it as human as possible. There are many possibilities of where the show can go, and I'm just excited to see what the next season brings."

Behr's enthusiasm is slightly surprising, compared to the sullenness that his character Max often carries with him. "I love the show," the actor proclaims. "As an actor you go out there and you try to get on a film or TV show. It's only every now and then that you become involved with something that you're so positive about. This show is just such a good thing, creatively and emotionally. You sometimes hear people talk about how a cast and crew are like an extended family, but until ROSWELL I never really understood what that meant. I enjoy going to work every single day. It's not really work in the conventional sense, because you're having a good time doing what you're doing. Yet we still feel that we're doing the best work we've ever done."










Jason Behr AOL Chat
Date: April 17, 2000

Jason Behr came by AOL Live to chat about the hit WB series Roswell. Jason discussed his sensational performance in the lead role as alien Max Evans, as well as his early career on the shows Dawson's Creek, 7th Heaven and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

MrLiveGuy: Jason Behr will be right up -- keep sending in those great questions! Jason Behr is coming up now!

Jason Behr: ...Apparently some people have been sending individual packets, but it's been -- the support for the show from the viewers has been tremendously overwhelming, and everyone at the show is very grateful for it.

Matt Wagner: “If there is one thing you can change about yourself, what would it be? And what nationality are you?”
Jason Behr: Boy, oh boy. Well, I -- what I would change about myself? I think that -- I don't have an answer for that one. I think that everyone is flawed, and I think that sometimes the best things about somebody is their flaws. Otherwise, if everyone is perfect, it would be kind of boring. So I don't have an answer for that one. As far as -- what was the other part that of question?

Matt Wagner: What nationality?
Jason Behr: Wow. I'm a lot of different things. I'm like a Heinz 57.

Matt Wagner: So you're American. That's kind of what defines an American.
Jason Behr: Absolutely.

Matt Wagner: How did you get the part as Max Evans for "Roswell"?
Jason Behr: Well, I read the script for "Roswell" when I was in North Carolina working on "Dawson's Creek." I was having a great time there with everybody on the cast and the crew. And it was just one of those stories that you -- I was immediately drawn to, immediately affected by. And I just wanted to be a part of it.

Matt Wagner: What aspect of the story was it that you liked? Was it the alien aspect, the romance?
Jason Behr: I think it was everything. The script was rich with metaphor and irony that kept it a little light, but it was also very honest about relationship and about emotion, and just -- it was one of those things that had a bunch of different elements and a good story. It was very hard to say no to something like that. Themes like teen alienation and the search for self and your place in the world, I think that everybody can kind of associate with.
Matt Wagner: Right.

Question: Hi, Jason. I just want to say that you do an incredible job on "Roswell" every week, and I'm curious as to what your favorite scene has been during season one.
Jason Behr: Boy, I think my favorite scene on the show thus far has been -- everybody on the show is just great. Everyone has their own unique quirks and personalities and it's just -- I've been really lucky with the people that I've been working with, especially on "Roswell." But my favorite scene so far I think would probably have to be -- God, Katherine Heigl, she breaks my heart. She's a wonderful actress.
Jason Behr: And there was a scene in "The Toy House" where we were discussing whether or not to tell our mother to get her to try to help us because we were sort of stuck between disclosing the truth or asking her to stop asking questions. And there's a scene at the end where I had to tell her that I couldn't, and it was just -- it was just one of those things when you're doing a scene, it just felt very real.

Matt Wagner: Yeah, that's cool. Is that what you look for, to forget that you're acting and just be in the moment?
Jason Behr: Yeah, I think all the rest of the technical aspects of it, you learn along the way. But if you're not there and you're not feeling what you're supposed to be feeling, you're just kind of fabricating that, people see it. I mean there are certain tricks that actors use to make themselves appear to feel a certain way, but most of the people out there watching are a little more intelligent than that. And the camera picks that up. So if you're not really there and you're not really feeling it, it's just kind of fake.

Matt Wagner: You said everyone has their own little quirks, personality. “Out of the whole cast of "Roswell," who are you mostly close to? Love, Grace.”
Jason Behr: I'm glad your name isn't that, and it's Grace. Everybody on the show has been -- again, they're a unique group of individuals. But we all seem to get along in a way that is just special. Everybody is great to work with. And we all have fun when we should. Sometimes we mess around a little more than we should, and should probably remain a little more focused. But for the most part we just have a good time when we're supposed to, on and off the screen.

Matt Wagner: “What is going to happen with you and Liz? Any hints, please, please, pretty please?”
Jason Behr: I'm not exactly sure what's going to happen with Liz. We've been -- we've been exploring that relationship for, like, the first part of the year basically, just trying to -- any relationship you get into is complicated, especially that of what you think is supposed to be that true love, that one special person.

Matt Wagner: Right.
Jason Behr: And we've been slowly but surely allowing them to get closer and closer and closer. But just -- it's like Murphy's Law. When things start to get just at that moment of being perfect, something is going to happen. I don't know exactly what that is. But right now Liz and Max are very, very close and very much happy together, regardless of the circumstances they're in.

Matt Wagner: How far ahead do you know? I mean, do the producers, do they talk to you about, you know, your overall story arc? Or does it surprise you as it surprises viewers?
Jason Behr: It certainly surprises me. Sometimes you read a script and -- and, what the hell's that about? But I think that's the nice thing about it, is that the writers don't really divulge too much information to you. Because I think the whole story about "Roswell" is that -- is that moment of discovery, and as we discover, as a cast, and when we're reading the scripts, we -- if we have any idea of what is in store for the future, we might be foreshadowing without even knowing it. So they allow us certain information, but a lot is withheld because of that.

Matt Wagner: Sunspot says: What is tonight's "Roswell" about?
Jason Behr: Tonight's episode is called "[Tess,] Lies and Videotape," and this girl sets off red flags to everybody. Everybody new in their lives is considered a danger, is considered different and, therefore, everyone is paranoid just about everyone. So we suspect her to be a government spy. And she has -- Max is sort of -- he's oddly drawn to her in a way that he shouldn't be, because he's supposed to be completely in love with Liz. And he thinks that it has something to do with that she could be an FBI spy.
Jason Behr: And so the whole episode tonight is about trying to discover information about her without letting on that we're actually looking, because it's pretty dangerous, the way that they've built up this FBI special unit, how -- how elite they are and how dangerous they are, and that killing somebody is not really beyond their means. I mean, they -- they've been not too nice to a lot of people.

Matt Wagner: So the risks are high?
Jason Behr: Yes.

Matt Wagner: Grace is back. I'll just call her Grace: What was the craziest thing a fan ever did to get your attention?
Jason Behr: I don't have anything for that one either. The people for the most part have been just very gracious and very kind, and there hasn't been any incident that I can recall that has been anything that crosses lines. Everyone has been very respectful and incredibly -- just gracious is the best word I can use. They don't have to do this kind of stuff. I mean, you guys don't have to do this kind of stuff, and I know that I, myself, am very thankful for it, and I know that everyone at "Roswell" and all the support that we've gotten -- everyone is just very, very thankful.

Matt Wagner: Do you get stopped on the street by your fans?
Jason Behr: I've been working for like the past nine months. So I really haven't had an opportunity to go out and do much of anything else. But when they do stop and say something, it's just very -- it's very nice, and they don't try to draw too much attention. So far I haven't had a bad experience.

Matt Wagner: That's great. That's good. Luna says: Who is your biggest role model?
Jason Behr: My biggest role model? Definitely have to be my mother. She -- she was incredibly supportful of me in pursuing this and in doing this. Never -- never pushed me to do anything that I didn't want to do, just always said, “Whatever you want to do, Jason. If that makes you happy, then go for it. I believe in you.” She taught me a lot in my life.

Matt Wagner: That's good. That's lucky. I know a lot of actors have trouble with their parents sometimes, getting into the business, because it is such a risky business. So that's lucky. That's a good thing to have.
Jason Behr: I feel very lucky.

Matt Wagner: Pam says: What is the one place on the planet that you would like to visit or see?
Jason Behr: Place I'd like to see? I would love to go to -- to Europe. I haven't been -- the only place that I've really been outside the United States is Cancun, and that was for a senior trip of mine. And so I really -- I haven't had the chance to travel too much outside the United States. So I'd love to go to Europe. I'd love to go to Italy and Greece and England, France, Ireland, Scotland. I'd love to take the opportunity to go over there and just experience that culture, because there's so much history there. And pretty good food, too.

Matt Wagner: Maybe the show -- you know, the FBI will chase you guys across the world.
Jason Behr: We take it on the road. That wouldn't be a bad idea.

Matt Wagner: You could work and get your traveling done at the same time. Star says: Jason, do you have any secret crushes on movie stars?
Jason Behr: I was always a huge fan of Audrey Hepburn. I had the biggest crush on her when I was a kid. Just class. Elegant, graceful. Yeah.

Matt Wagner: Yeah, she was great. Angel says: Hi, Jason. I love the show. I was wondering what you like to do in your free time. If you have any.
Jason Behr: We just wrapped the show about three days ago, so I really haven't had much free time before that because -- you can break the season up into three parts. The beginning part of the season was kind of getting to know the characters and how they relate to each other, and as those relationships involve those changes, they've kind of paired off the characters. And then the second part was trying to find out what we do from there with moving the show forward.
Jason Behr: In the last six shows we have in the series, this first season, everything moves, everything changes, everything is constantly evolving. All this information that they've gathered about themselves and what they've thought to be true ends up not being what they really thought. And so we've been putting a lot of hard work in the last six episodes of the show, so I haven't had a lot of free time. But when I do get free time, I enjoy spending time with my family a lot. And watching movies. I have a lot of movies to catch up on. And I play basketball as much as I possibly can. And I love watching them. The Lakers and the Timberwolves, a big fan. So that's what I mostly do with my free time.

Matt Wagner: Cool. “Was it hard making the transition from ‘Dawson's Creek’ to ‘Roswell’? Because on ‘Dawson's Creek,’ you were more of a mean character.”
Jason Behr: That's very nice. Mean is probably the nicest way to put it. Chris Wolfe, the character I played on "Dawson's Creek," was like an unapologetic, fun character. He really didn't have any responsibilities, and he didn't care about stepping on anybody's toes. He just wanted to have a good time and enjoy himself. So he didn't really care too much about the consequences of his actions.
Jason Behr: On "Roswell," Max is kind of the polar opposite of that. He's sort of the antithesis to Chris Wolfe. Everything he does has consequences. I just have to get in the mind-set that everyone is watching, everybody knows what you're doing, and to make a move and to do anything in his life, he really has to think things out, which is -- it's kind of sad, in a way, to live your life like that, but that's the only choice you have.

Matt Wagner: Is it more fun to play someone with more abandon?
Jason Behr: Sometimes. Sometimes, yes. Sometimes, yes. But there's a limit to that, because a character like that -- on "Dawson's Creek," he was sort of limited to his character development. He couldn't change into the good guy. He couldn't realize he was making the wrong choices, because if he did, as soon as he did that, he wouldn't be Chris Wolfe, the wild guy. But I had a great time. He was a fun character to play. But I didn't see much longevity in him. But with Max, I mean, he's just kind of coming out of his shell a little bit and being able to live life a little more and spread his wings.

Matt Wagner: Lots of potential there.
Jason Behr: There's a lot of potential there.

Matt Wagner: How old were you when you first started acting?
Jason Behr: I was 5 years old. I did a season's greeting for a local station in Minneapolis. And I remember distinctly thinking that a guy who was -- who was driving a coach, a coach and buggy, it was a season's greeting affiliate tag for one of the stations. And the guy was driving the buggy looked like Abraham Lincoln. And I think at that time when I was 5 years old I knew that Abraham Lincoln was a president we had, but I didn't know he was dead. I thought, “How did they get him to drive this buggy?” -- so that was my first acting job.

Matt Wagner: Did you continue after that? Was it something you wanted to do since that time?
Jason Behr: Yeah. Absolutely. Absolutely. I got out of school, they gave me McDonald's Happy Meals, and I thought this is the life. So I think that was what first bit me. But since then I was doing some theater and some commercials and stuff, and I moved out here after high school and that's when I really pursued it.

Matt Wagner: Mandy would like to know: I noticed the Gopher hat. Still clinging to your Minnesota roots?
Jason Behr: Yeah, yeah. Thank you, Mandy. Most people ask me if it means Michigan or Mickey Mouse. Yeah, I've had it for a while. I go back to Minnesota as much as I possibly can. Lately it's been less, but usually twice a year. It's a beautiful city. It's something that eventually I'd love to have a place back there.

Matt Wagner: Do you like Los Angeles?
Jason Behr: I love Los Angeles. Los Angeles is -- culturally, it's open. There's so much here to learn, so much to experience. And you can go and do anything you want. I mean, one morning you can go surfing. You can wake up the next morning and drive to the mountains and go skiing or snowboarding. You can go hiking or fishing, or you can go to one of the clubs on the strip. You can do just about anything you want here. So I absolutely love it out here.

Matt Wagner: A real Roswell well says: Will you and/or the others in the cast ever come to visit the real Roswell, New Mexico? By the way, you are all incredible, and the show rocks.
Jason Behr: Thank you very much. Thank you. In the beginning, we thought that we might want to go travel, take like a class trip and all.

Matt Wagner: Research trip.
Jason Behr: Yeah. And all go down to Roswell and check it out. But things just happened too fast, we're never really allowed to. So I'm not sure if it -- it will be a wonderful, interesting experience to go down there now. Because apparently it's -- a lot of stuff in Roswell is like that in reality. Apparently they have a lot of the little UFO centers.

Matt Wagner: Do you guys get contacted by people from Roswell? I mean, do you get a lot of fan letters from people from there?
Jason Behr: I've gotten a few. I've gotten a few from Roswell. But everything's been really nice, all the stuff that I get.

Matt Wagner: Do you get contacted by aliens? Do they send you fan letters?
Jason Behr: Not that I know of.

Matt Wagner: Which leads me to the next question here. “Do you believe,” and I'm sure you've been asked this before, “Do you believe in aliens?”
Jason Behr: I have been asked that before, a couple times. But I don't know. You know, scientists say that it's mathematically impossible for us to be the only ones out there, and when you look up there, it's a pretty big space. And you have the sense of feeling really, really small with all that out there. But I don't think anyone's really going to truly believe until it's sitting right in front of you and talking to you. Because no one really wants to believe something like that until -- well, I shouldn't say no one, but most of the people out there are not going to really accept it until it's actual, tangible proof. And I think that that day could come in the next 10 years. It could come in the next 200 years. It may never come at all. But until that time, it's just pure speculation.

Matt Wagner: Jody wants to know: Hey, Jason. I'm dying to know, have you ever been victim to a practical joke or been part of a practical joke on the set? Who is the biggest goof on the set? Love you.
Jason Behr: Well, Jody, I think everyone has fallen victim to some sort of practical joke in their life. On the set of "Roswell," we have a few goof-offs.

Matt Wagner: And are you one of them?
Jason Behr: I think everybody has a good time. Everybody has a good time on the set. Nothing in particular that I could probably say right now happened. There are some alleged things, but for the most part it's just -- it's just noises and bodily functions. Sometimes people have a tendency to do that. But usually it's a camera operator -- Max, if you're out there, I'm sorry. Not the camera operator, but one of the camera assistants had a penchant for flatulation. And it wasn't so much a practical joke but a daily occurrence we sort of learned to live with.

Matt Wagner: So at first it was funny, and it just became....
Jason Behr: Yeah.

Matt Wagner: “We love you here in Australia. Do you ever plan to visit Australia to promote ‘Roswell’?”
Jason Behr: Thank you very much. Thank you. Australia. The girl who plays Tess is actually from Australia. And we have one of our crew ladies is from Australia, and they were both telling me that I have to go down there and see the country. And at some point, I would love to come down there, if they would have me, you know, to promote the show or just to take a vacation.

Matt Wagner: Sounds like they would have you. “Jason, ever coming back to North Carolina for a reunion on "’Dawson's Creek’? I live here and would love to see you.”
Jason Behr: I tried three times this year to get down there. One of the directors who was on "Dawson's Creek" -- and I became really good friends with him, and he came over and directed a few of the "Roswell" episodes. And we were trying to schedule a surprise visit, but nothing ever worked out. It was just kind of like, you know, we're working so much, and to get us to North Carolina from Los Angeles you have to take a plane to New York and then -- I'm sorry, a plane to Charlotte, and then you have to take a smaller plane to North Carolina to Wilmington. Or you can go to New York and then go back. Most of the time I stop in Charlotte. But it takes all day to get there.
Jason Behr: So if I were to get off work on a Friday night early enough, I'd get there on a Saturday night, I'd have to leave Sunday to be to work on Monday, so it never really worked out. But one of these days.

Matt Wagner: Pop singer 910 says: Hey, Jason, my name is Leslie. I heard that Howie of the Backstreet Boys is going to be a guest star; is that true? And when is the season finale?
Jason Behr: I guess you'll have to tune in to find out. The season finale, I don't even know exactly what the date is on that. I know that tonight is "Tess, Lies and Videotape." Then after that we have "Four Square," "Max to the Max," "The White Room" and then the finale. So in about six weeks you'll have to watch -- yeah. It's been rumored that that might happen.

Matt Wagner: “Love Jason,” it says. “Are you doing any movies soon? I heard about one that should be coming out soon. Thanks.”
Jason Behr: Right now, we just wrapped, like I said. We just wrapped, and I've been reading scripts trying to find just the right one to work on over the summer, because we only have three months between seasons. And I've read a few scripts out there, and some of it is very interesting. I'm just trying to find the right one that I feel that's the one I want to do, that one I really can have a good time on.

Matt Wagner: Well, that was our last question. Thank you so much for coming. A pleasure to have you here.
Jason Behr: Thank you.

Matt Wagner: Good luck on your break. Hope you find that script and get some rest. We'd love to have you back.
Jason Behr: Absolutely.

Matt Wagner: Thank you all for joining us here. I'm your host, Matt Wagner. See you next time on America Online!

MrLiveGuy: Thanks for all of your great questions for Jason Behr! Be sure to catch “Roswell”! Take care, and have a great evening.

Copyright 2000 America Online, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Portions of this transcript may be edited by AOL to correct spelling, punctuation and/or remove any material that violates AOL's Terms of Service.










J-14 MAGAZINE-May 2000

Here's J-14's revealing Q&A with Roswell hottie Jason Behr:

J-14: Does it get overwhelming to know that there are people setting up Jason Behr websites everywhere?
Jason: It's very flattering. Again, it's not something you expect, but people don't have to do it; they don't have to invest their time and energy to create these things. But they do it because they're passionate about the show (Roswell).
J-14: How would you say the character of Max has evolved since the beginning of the season?
Jason: In the beginning, he was the conscience of the group. I think he learned over the course of this year that he can't always take positions and always tell people what the right things to do are, or what the wrong things to do are. He has learned not to be as controlling.
J-14: Did Max change in ways that were sort of unexpected to you in the beginning?
Jason: It seemed like a natural course. They always throw us curve balls; we never know what's happening from one script to the next.
J-14: So you don't know the grand scheme?
Jason: No. I'm not sure if they don't know or if they're keeping it a tightly-bound secret.
J-14: I've heard you're a fan of all this stuff.
Jason: I think the idea of aliens living among us is very appealing. If it was true, how would they be accepted? People are afraid of what they don't know and have to face that fear in order to deal with them and the situation.
J-14: They've been talking about upping the sci-fi aspect of the show and downplaying the romance. Do you think that that's the right way to go?
Jason: I think there will always be a balance. That's important. But if we sway more to the science fiction side of it or the X-Files side of it, that's fine with me.
J-14: Are there any directions you'd like to see the show go in the second season?
Jason: I think the way things have been going would be a fine way to continue, as long as there's a balance of science fiction/thriller with heart while keeping it as human as possible.
J-14: You really seem positive about the show.
Jason: I love it. As an actor, you go out there and you want to work. This show is just such a good thing - creatively and emotionally. I feel like one of the luckiest people around.










TEEN MAGAZINE-May 2000

Star Trivia Test Studded

So you think You’re in the know when it comes to the personal details of Hollywood’s hottest honeys? Take this quiz and see how down you really are with these fabulous fellas.

There were two questions about Jason Behr and a nice blown up picture of him on pg. 78. Brendan Fehr is also pictured in Teen as part of the quiz. Shiri Appleby is featured on the cover of Teen Magazine and there is an article about spending a day in the animal ER with her new fury friends.

--Conducted by Jodi Bryson










Roswell Star Reveals Paper Cut Drama
Tuesday, May 23, 2000

We've all heard that being an actor isn't as glamorous as it seems, but for Roswell's Jason Behr stardom is downright painful.

The actor tells TV Guide Online that working on the cult hit has its ups and downs. "I have a lot less sleep. I spend less time with family and friends and [get] a lot more paper cuts!" Paper cuts? "We get script changes all the time and we have to put in the new pages [ourselves] and I cut myself all the time."

Poor Behr better stock up on Band-Aids because Roswell is returning for another season - thanks in large part to viewer support. "It's been tremendous," he explains. "All the hot sauce that [the fans] sent in was very influential in getting the attention of the network. This one fan sent me a really cool hot-sauce leather holster. You don't expect that kind of stuff."

His devoted fans can count on the show becoming more like The X-Files, with less emphasis on romance and high school. "They're going to delve more into the mythology. The first season was more about getting to know the characters and the relationships, but the second season [the aliens] discover they have a much larger responsibility."

The 27-year-old plans to lay low during his hiatus. "I'm going to sleep a lot! We're starting off early so the window of going out and working on something else is closing quickly," he says. "I'm not going to work just for the sake of working. I want to wait it out and make sure that choice of film is the right one."

- Eddie Roche










CNN INTERVIEW WITH JASON BEHR - June 2000
'Roswell' actor promises more alien exploration

"Roswell" star Jason Behr promises a deeper exploration of his alien side now that WB has renewed the show for a second season.

Jason: "It feels great. It feels wonderful," he said. "We still have a lot more story to tell. There is still a lot left with where we can go with the three aliens and the relationship."

Behr, who plays a Tabasco-swigging high school student with a dark secret, moved to Los Angeles five years ago, leaving his mother and four siblings in Minnesota. He performed on several WB shows, including "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Dawson's Creek" before landing the job on "Roswell." Behr wants to believe there really are aliens out there.

Jason: "If you sit and you look at a map of the galaxy and the universe, you feel really small, you feel like there has to be something else out there, at least you hope," he said. "The idea that there is no one out there is really sad."










Teen Alien
By IAN SPELLING
Starlog June 2000

Jason Behr has just wrapped a long day on the set of 'Roswell High'. Can he answer the questions agonising many a 'Roswell' fan: are Max, his sister Isabel (Katherine Heigl) and their good friend Michael (Brendan Fehr) actually the aliens that crash-landed in Roswell? Or are they the descendants of those aliens? Oh yeah, and do the aliens whatever they are, age? Behr smiles. "That's the wonder of Roswell." Yeah, yeah. And the answer is…?

"…We don't know," he finally says. "As an actor playing this character who is completely clueless about what's going on, it's okay for me not to know. I'm finding out about the character pretty much at the same time the audience is, and that's the case for all of us in the cast. It's a little cryptic, and I think that's good. You can't tell the whole story too soon, because then you don't experience it as it happens. What we do know is that the three aliens believe that they're from this 1947 crash. They don't know if they're descendants of aliens on the ship or whether they were on the ship. At any moment things could change. I guess the moral of the story is to live every day as if it's the last."

Human Pursuits
Max, Isabel and Michael live each day in fear for their lives. If they're not being pursued by the dogged Sheriff Valenti (William Sadler), they're praying Max's simmering relationship with Liz (Shiri Appleby), whom he saved in the series pilot by using his E.T-like healing powers, doesn't leave them vulnerable to discovery. And if the Max-Liz union doesn't blow their cover, there's always the possibility that Maria (Majandra Delfino) might run off at the mouth in the wrong place at the wrong time. To date, 'Roswell' has done an exemplary job of mixing it up, of exploring personal relationships and delivering a compelling combination of SF, thrills, suspense and romantic longing.

Behr believes the show has made considerable strides since the pilot, which aired on Sky One earlier this year to strong reviews and impressive ratings. "The first episode didn't utilise all of the characters," he notes. "It had one main story - the one about Liz and Max seeing each other in this new light. Since then we've been able to pick different characters and try to explore their personalities, emotions and relationships. In the second episode [The Morning After], we got to know Michael a lot more than we did in the pilot. We know that he doesn't think his life in Roswell is so great. So he has more of a motive to leave Roswell than the others.

"Then, in Monsters, we got a chance to see Maria, her paranoia, how she sees us. I thought her dream sequence was interesting. It was a very telling way to get her perception of us. She sees us as these monsters. Now that we've got to know most of the main characters pretty well, we can go ahead and tell stories. And the words, all the inflections and all the little looks mean much more at this point, because the audience knows the characters, knows more about them. As characters, we're constantly searching to find out more about our past, about where we came from. I n searching for that past, we might actually find a different kind of future. The more we know these character, the more we care about them, the more interesting their search is."

Back of Beyond
At this point, about a dozen episodes into 'Roswell High', we know that Max, who works, ironically enough, in a UFO museum, is a terribly conflicted young man/alien. He's frustrated and confused as to what's the right choice to make when it comes to Liz. And he's worried that what might be right for him may not be right for Isabel and Michael. "He's very aware of other people's emotions and feelings, and he tries to take them into account," comments Behr. "He knows that Michael does not want to be in Roswell anymore, that he's the one most actively seeking the truth. Max understands that, Max knows that his sister is the polar opposite. She likes her life in Roswell. Although she might have a tough exterior, she's a very sweet and loving person. She just tries to put up this façade and not let anyone else in, but she really does like Roswell. She doesn't necessarily want to know the truth, though some part of her probably does.

"Max is in love with Liz, this girl he knows he can never be with because they're just so different. He doesn't know enough about who he is to allow himself to move forward, honestly, in a relationship. If he doesn’t' know himself, doesn't know his own capabilities , where he's from, what emotions he's capable of or what physical things he is or isn't able to do, how can he really get together with Liz?

There are questions hanging in the air and, hopefully, we'll answer them all over time. There's actually a lot I would like to explore. There's a great deal just in that conflict about his relationship with Liz that interests me. If he allows himself to love, where does that put him? He opens himself up to vulnerability. If, in fact, Michael, Isabel and I are exposed and we had to leave Roswell, I would now have to leave behind one more person I really, really care about. The more the relationship evolves, the more difficult the decision becomes.

"If we do find the truth, if somewhere down the line we do find out where we come from and possibly even how to get back to our home, how does Max leave not only his family, but also Liz, this woman he has come to love in a different way than he has ever come to experience? I think Max realises that the closer he gets to the truth, the closer he is to losing her and the more uncertain his future is in Roswell.

"For me as an actor, it's a challenge," Behr continues. "For a while, Max wasn't actively looking for the truth, or pursuing his relationship with Liz. He was just kind of sitting there. Mostly, Michael has had that proactive feeling about him. He has gone out and done something about it. Max, for a while, sat there, conflicted about everything. Finally, he realised that he can't do that. And he made the decision: "I do want to know about my past. I do want to know where I cam from. When it's time to make decisions, I'll make them then, but right now I need to know"."

Alien Endeavours
Tomorrow, Behr will be back on set with his fellow actors, but chances are that nothing for a long while on 'Roswell' will compare with his strangest day yet. The day unfolded a few moths back, during production on the episode Monsters, which featured a rather memorable - to watch and to shoot - dream sequence. "They dressed me up in this horribly cheesy green jumpsuit, painted my face green and put this really nasty wig on me," Behr says, shaking his head at the memory. "I looked like an alien Elvis. Then, they gave me those really cool alien eyes. I guess it worked out in the end, because it was all about how Maria saw us. She's a little quirky, a little abstract, so she projected her personality onto her dreams of us.

"It made sense that her visions of us were a little left of centre. I had to sit in this costume all day. Everything I touched in my trailer became green. For the longest time, I just sat there in my chair and didn't move, didn't touch anything. By the day's end I was so sick of it, so sick of doing nothing, that I was using my phone, touching things on purpose and reading scripts. By the time I went home that night, I had green palm prints everywhere."

Behr contemplates both his current good fortune and the impact of 'Roswell High' on his present and future. After all, every actor yearns to latch on to a hit series which can serve as a springboard to even bigger and better things. Doors often slammed in an actor's face suddenly open with ease. Yet, expect for that tiny window of opportunity called hiatus, actors on TV shows rarely have time to maximise their new-found star power. An actor, in a sense, can be trapped by the very vehicle that raised his profile in the first place. Then there's the loss of privacy and the crazy hours spent filming a show, not to mention the time and energy spent promoting it and one's self.

Behr listens to the bittersweet scenario and nods his head in agreement. He can, no doubt, relate to much of the above, but he's not looking for anyone to share tears over his plight. "You wait, you starve and you try really hard to get work," Jason Behr concludes. "And once you get work, you long for free time, just to take a breath every now and then. But it gives you such opportunities. It does open doors. You just have to find a way to make it work, to make the schedule work. Right now, though, it's all about the story and the people that you work with, at least that's what it is for me. If it's not interesting and fun, it's not worth doing. If you can't tell a good story and tell it as well as you can - and in the process enjoy who you're with and where you are - it's not worth doing.

"So far 'Roswell High' has been a treat. Hopefully, whatever project I take on next, whenever that is, will be with people I think are interesting and, hopefully, it will have an interesting story."










Behring It All - July 2000
By Dennis Hensley

On "Roswell" he plays the quiet, mysterious Max Evans, but in person Jason Behr is far from reserved. Here he opens up about his new celebrity status, describes his fantasy woman and clues us in on what he’ll be doing down the Hollywood pike.

JASON AT THE MOVIES

Behr finishes our sentences about films

The first move I ever saw in a theater was…

Star Wars. I went back and saw it over and over again. I liked both Han Solo and Luke Skywalker. I had the hots for Princess Leia and I wanted a buddy like R2-D2. Between me and my brothers, we had all the action figures. It was like “I’ll do the dishes, I’ll mow the lawn, I’ll do whatever, but can I just have Chewbacca?”

The movie that inspired my first crush was..

Breakfast at Tiffany’s Audrey Hepburn is so incredible. Growing up, my parents loved old movies so I’d watch with them and I remember being smitten with Audrey. I always liked older women.

The movie that scared the $#@ out of me was…

Jaws For the longest time I thought that there could be sharks in the lake and every time I touched something in the water, I’d cringe and bring my feet up. I had nightmares for years when I’d wake up in a cold sweat screaming, “Jaws is gonna get me!”

The movie my mom didn’t want me to watch but I watched anyway was…

An Amercian Werewolf in London She thought I’d be scared and she was so right. After that, I was no longer afraid of sharks, I was afraid of werewolfs!

The movie that got me interested in aliens was…

E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial I remember fantasing about what it would be like meet somebody, something like E.T.

My favorite movie of all time is..

The Godfather It’s just a classic.

Jason Behr knows he’s in a sick and unhealthy relationship, but he doesn’t care. He’s in love. "The first time I got some, I had this epiphany, like, ‘Where have you been all my life?’ It’s like I can’t get enough," says the 26-year-old star of the WB’s teen alien drama "Roswell." No, he’s not talking about Michelle Williams, whom he romanced on "Dawson’s Creek," or Sarah Michelle Gellar, with whom he sparred on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," or even Shiri Appleby, his lip-locking partner on "Roswell." No, Jason’s talking about donuts. "Every Sunday for months, my buddies and I would drive for over an hour to the nearest Krispy Kreme," he says. "Once there we would watch the donuts from conception to birth on this huge apparatus, the donut-birthing machine. Then, as soon as we bit into them, the trumpets would blare, the angels would sing and the sun would shine."

Though there weren’t any trumpets, Behr received a pretty friendly welcome when he arrived in Hollywood from Minneapolis eight years ago, fresh out of high school. Within days of stepping off the plane, he has an agent and a manager and began hitting the audition trail. After a series of guest spots on TV shows, he landed "Roswell", which has gained him loads of respect from casting agents who see great potential for a big-screen career. Will he soon find himself starring in films, like his networkmates from "Dawson’s Creek"? It’s too soon to say. But one thing’s for sure—this Behr bears watching.

Dennis Hensley: I can’t get over your donut obsession. How many do you put away in one sitting?

Jason Behr: A box of 12 easily, in the blink of an eye. I’ve gotta watch it. I can go overboard.

Q: Have you been a donut addict since childhood?

A: No. I discovered them when I was shooting "Dawson’s Creek" in North Carolina. Every weekend I’d go pig out on donuts and when I’d come back to L.A., I’d have withdrawals.

Q: Where did you grow up:

A: All over, from Minneapolis to Arizona to California. My parents liked to move around a lot. After they split up, we settled down in Richfield, near Minneapolis, where I went to high school.

Q: Did you always feel like the new kid?

A: Yeah. You want to make friends yet you know you’re probably going to have to leave anyway. We never got a chance to grow our roots down so we grew them sideways. That’s why my family is pretty close. I have three brothers: one older and two younger, and an 11-year-old sister from my dad’s second marriage, who just came out here to visit.

Q: Your sister must think it’s so cool that you’re on this hot teen show?

A: [Laughs] Well, she’s like 11 going on 35. She’s always been honest with me about my work. When I was starting out, I was playing all these jerks. After I was on "Dawson’s" she called me up and asked, "When you are ever NOT going to play a creep?" I thought that was hilarious.

Q: What’s your favorite memory of being on "Dawson’s Creek?"

A: Hanging out off set with the cast. We had a blast. Here I was this new kid and they had already been on the show for a year and instead of being standoffish, they were incredibly nice.

Q: Did your being on "Dawson’s Creek" contribute to your getting the "Roswell" job because they’re both on the WB?

A: It had nothing to do with it. "Roswell" was originally going to be on Fox.

Q: What made you want to be on "Roswell," besides the fact that it was a major gig?

A: When I first read the script I immediately understood what they were going for-the mystery, the suspense, the relationships, the unrequited love story. I related to Max’s search for the truth about himself, about life, about his place in this world, which I think everybody goes through.

Q: This season you had some heavy make-out scenes with your costar, Shiri Appleby. What are those like to shoot?

A: It’s always an odd thing, but Shiri and I have gotten to know each other so well over the last nine months that there’s nothing uncomfortable about it.

Q: Are we going to get more romance in upcoming episodes?

A: More everything. The stakes are raised. Everything’s bigger, faster, stronger, and more intense, emotionally and physically. Everything that they knew to be true in their lives comes crumbling down around them piece by piece.

Q: Has the success of the show lead to any movie offers?

A: I’ve been reading a lot of scripts, trying to figure out the right one. I’ll only choose a movie if I like the story and the actors and directors involved. If the only reason you’re picking a movie is because you think it’s going to make you a movie star and make a lot of money, then you’re missing something. You have to be willing to take a risk and stand naked in front of everybody. And if I make a mistake, then, big deal. I’ll learn from it and move on. It’s not about how fast you can attain something, it’s about the trip to get there.

Q: Do you feel pressure to capitalize on the heat that you have now?

A: No. I don’t want to work just for the sake of working.

Q: What actors do you look up to?

A: Paul Newman. He’s the definition of class. His career has spanned generations, he’s always challenged himself and delivered great performances. He’s been married to the same woman for years, and makes a hell of a Caesar salad dressing.

Q: Speaking of women, are you dating anyone now?

A: No. I’m so focused on "Roswell," it’s kind of unfair to anybody to get involved. I say that now, but I could go off tomorrow and meet the right person you just know when you know.

Q: What kind of qualities do you look for in a girlfriend?

A: Someone who has convictions, yet is open-minded enough to appreciate others for theirs.

Q: If you could be a girl for a day, what you want to experience?

A: [Laughs] I can’t answer that, my mother would kill me.

Q: What would happen in your fantasy episode in your fantasy episode of "Roswell"?

A: We would go to the Bahamas where we have our own private beach, then Max gets lost in the jungle…only to be rescued by Catherine Zeta-Jones. [Laughs]

Q: I don’t think Michael Douglas would be too happy about that. Tell me a behind-the-scenes secret from the set.

A: Well, the Tabasco sauce that we eat all the time is V8 juice, but the first time we tried to tough it out and use the real stuff. Then during the scene, our eyes started watering and our noses started plugging up, but we just kept going. As soon as they yelled, "Cut," we all ran for water.

Q: Your character’s a virgin, right?

A: Oh yeah. The first time he’d ever kissed somebody was when he kissed Liz [Shiri Appleby] and they had such an intense connection. I can’t imagine what would happen if they ever had sex.

Q: Do you hang out much with your costars?

A: We hung out a lot in the beginning, playing pool, bowling, having dinner, watching movies, but because of our schedules, its been harder lately.

Q: Do you ever bring your Akita, Ronin, to the set?

A: Paramount Studios, where most of "Roswell" is filmed, doesn’t allow dogs, but I sneak him in every now and then. He loves it when we’re on location in the desert.

Q: You started performing when you were five. What was the first thing you did?

A: A "Seasons Greetings" spot for one of the local channels in Minneapolis. I was on a sleigh and for some reason, I thought that our sleigh driver was Abe Lincoln. He looked exactly like him.

Q: It must have been great having the extra cash as a kid.

A: It was great because my mom was a single mother raising four boys and it was nice to have another income.

Q: Were you popular with girls?

A: At first, not at all. I remember being very short. I felt like a little boy walking among men. It was like I was in the wrong school. Finally, when I was a junior, I shot up.

Q: How’d you learn about the facts of life?

A: I overheard my big brother and his friends talking about it.

Q: What’s a day from your childhood that you’d like to go back and relive?

A: The day my brother Aaron was born. I was three and I remember being so happy. I already had an older brother and maybe I thought now I had someone to pick on. [Laughs] He became my best friend from that moment on.

Q: You used to be a ski instructor, right?

A: No. Where’d you get that from?

Q: One of your fan sites. Don’t you ever visit your sites?

A: I’ve wanted to, but I have to go over to someone’s house to do that. I’m pretty computer illiterate.

Q: A few of the fans online commented about how much they loved your ears. Do you get that a lot?

A: No. I don’t really think they stick out that much, but if they like them, then that’s a good thing.

Q: You did an episode of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." Did Sarah Michelle Gellar kick your ass?

A: No, I beat her up. [Laughs] I hit her with a crowbar and then she threw me into a pole.

Q: Do you remember the first time you got recognized?

A: No. I’m not really into the whole celebrity aspect of all this, though it has its good parts.

Q: When "Roswell" premiered there were billboards up all over the place. What’s it like to see your face on the side of a bus?

A: Very surreal. It almost feels all made up, like my mother went around paying people to put my face on billboards.

Q: When you’re not working what do you like to do?

A: I like to sleep, play basketball, ride go-carts, spend time with my family, go out with my buddies on the weekends and have a good time.

Q: Have you ever taken trips with your friends?

A: The farthest I’ve gone is Cancun, Mexico. It was my senior trip. I don’t think I slept more than 12 hours the entire week. None of us had much money, and I remember bringing a suitcase of food but that went pretty quick so we’d go to happy hour for the free food.

Q: What’s your idea of the perfect day?

A: At this point, the perfect day would be to get up in the afternoon, grab a bowl of Cocoa Pebbles and watch Thundercats and Robotech on the Cartoon Network for four or five hours.










Guys Confess Their Personal Secrets J-14 July 2000

Down To Earth but Not of This EarthAfter a lengthy day on the set of the WB drama Roswell, how does the star of the show Jason Behr unwind for the evening? Is he going to hit some clubs and party the night away? Is he going cruising with the guys? None of the above. Jason's idea of a good time is simple. He is content just vegging out, watching movies and eating pizza with some friends. "Movies, for me, usually mean a bunch of my buddies and a stack of pizza boxes," he says, "We try to create much of a theater atmosphere as possible so we turn the house lights out. Sometimes we even spill coke and spread out jujubees for authenticity. Jason is a real movie buff who treasures his growing supply of Blockbuster coupons. Come on girls -- admit it. Staying home and cuddling with Jason doesn't seem at all like an alien encouter. In fact, it sounds out of this world.










Jason in South Florida
- July 2000

Jason Behr visited South Florida 7/2-7/5/00. He was invited by WB affiliate station WB39 WBZL to make an appearance at "4th Along the Coast," a beach party in Fort Lauderdale to celebrate Independence Day. Jason was dressed casually in khakis, a tee, and ball cap. A fan who saw him at the event later commented on the message board "Jason, you looked really hot...you are extemely easy on the eyes!"

While at the beach event, Jason greeted 39 fans who won a "call-in-to-win" contest for a special VIP meeting and autograph session. There were MANY MORE who came by to catch a glimpse of Jason. He was very gracious to all his fans, braving the hot sun to sign autographs and pose for photos with all fans who were waiting for a chance to meet him. The crowd around Jason's VIP tent grew so large, it prompted a news helicopter to buzz overhead to investigate the scene!

Jason made a twilight appearance on the beach stage to enthusiastic fans who greeted him with some very artistic signs saying "WE LOVE YOU JASON," and offered his favorite donuts. Jason introduced the local band, Aztec Satellite.

A trendy art deco South Beach hotel, known internationally by celebrities, supermodels, and "Hollywood types" was Jason's home during his visit. Although he was kept busy with three different radio interviews, and several interviews with magazine and newspaper journalists, Jason did have some time for lunch on Lincoln Road (where we interviewed him) and for partying at the hottest South Beach clubs at night. Although he's a star, Jason is a typical Midwestern "nice" guy, very easygoing, and friendly.










Jason Behr Interview, by DishThis.com - July 3rd, 2000

This was an interview organized by DishThis.com. Fans wrote in and DishThis chose these questions to ask Jason.

Q: How old were you and what was the first experience you had that made you realize you wanted to be an actor?
-- abruzese
A:The very first thing I did, I was 5 years old, I was doing a theater production back in Minneapolis. I played one of the many sunflowers. But I was 5 so...I think it was a good place to start. But, I've been doing it for most of my life…doing a lot of theater stuff.. .Finally I just decided to pick up and move to Los Angeles.

Q: Hi Jason, do you have any clue of what might happen next season?
-- Leeps98
A:For the next season we're going to concentrate a little bit more on the alien side. So the second season will have more of a darker, edgier, "X-Filian" tone. We're going to explore the mythology of the aliens.

Q: Jason...do you really like Tabasco? Do you guys really eat it on the set?
-- Robin052072
A:I've been eating a lot of Tabasco sauce…a lot of Tabasco sauce. In the beginning, we tried to…Brendan Fehr plays one of the other aliens on the show…in the beginning we tried to tough it out and be men about it and 'oh yeah, yeah…give us the real stuff, give us the real stuff'…In the very first take, we were in the middle of our conversation and putting on the Tabasco sauce and we kept on talking and putting on the Tabasco sauce... he'd put the taco in his mouth and I'd sip on my drink…our eyes started to water…we had these boogs coming out of our nose…and just continued to try to talk and continue the conversation. By the end of the scene, we were just wet everywhere, we were sweating and shaking…so we don't use real Tabasco sauce anymore.

Q: Hey!! I just wanted to say that I LOVE THE SHOW!! Do any of the cast members or producers check out the...(Web) fan forum(s)? Because you can get a lot of (info on) what the fans want and REALLY good ideas!
-- jen_a4
A:I do, but I have to go over to friends' houses to do that, 'cause I'm pretty computer-stupid. Really, I don't know much about computers. I go to a friend's house and they do all that stuff, and I'm just sort of an observer. But I think…yeah...it's an important tool now. Producers log-on, and directors log-on and the network logs-on…they try to get an idea of what the viewers want to see. I think that it does have some sort of influence.

Q: I'm one of the fans that sent a bottle of Tabasco to the network. I'm so glad the fans were able to influence the WB to keep Roswell! What are your thoughts on the opportunities available to young actors like you?
-- jeannieH
A:Yeah…well, I think the great thing about the WB, is that it understands…the WB understands that there is a large core audience out there of younger adults that watch television. Something like Roswell…it has a very wide demographic but it does definitely caters to that audience. And I think that its important to have a network like that, that allows young people to express themselves in that way.

Q: Hey Jason, how do you like South Florida?
-- Isabelle
A:It's beautiful, its great. I've only been here for…going on twelve hours…it's a really pretty community. I like the buildings (in South Beach's art deco district).

Q: Do you like to go out much? Can you tell me if you are going clubhoppin' here in South Florida, and if so can you share where...?
-- Hunter_K
A:I love to get out as much as possible…as much as possible. I think we're going to actually go out and see some of the local clubs that you guys have here and experience the night life in South Beach, which I've never done before.










Alien Encounters

Interview: This interview is from the SunSentinel Ft. Lauderdale.

LIFESTYLE
ALIEN ENCOUNTER HE'S 26 AND A VETERAN NOW, BUT THE STAR OF TV'S
ROSWELL GOT HIS ACTING START AT AGE 5 PLAYING - A SUNFLOWER.
MELINA I. DE ROSE Staff Writer

07/17/2000
Sun-Sentinel Ft. Lauderdale
Boca Raton
Page 1D
(Copyright 2000 by the Sun-Sentinel)

Jason Behr has been practically everywhere on the WB map. Along a rising path of TV and movie roles, Behr made stops on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 7th Heaven, and Dawson's Creek. Until, like his alien character, he landed on Roswell .

Behr, 26, plays Max Evans, leader of the teen aliens left stranded on Earth after the legendary spaceship crash of 1947. The aliens and their show survived to see a second season this fall, backed by fans who flooded the WB network with bottles of Tabasco sauce, a spicy staple of the non-human diet.

On television, Behr's character has stayed close to Roswell , N.M., the one place he knows as home. In real life, the Minneapolis native moved to Los Angeles at age 19 after graduating from high school. As Behr tells it, he got a call from a long-lost skateboarding buddy who invited him to the West Coast. "So I got on a plane like a week later and that was it," Behr says. "It was just something that I felt I needed to do."

Behr makes it back to Minnesota only sporadically. But he had the opportunity to visit South Florida recently, appearing on Fort Lauderdale beach to sign autographs and pose for fan photos.

Q. You're on the Monday night slot now [9 p.m., WBZL-Ch. 39] after 7th Heaven. Are you happy there?
A. I didn't know how it was going to pan out because it's like the "God and Science Hour," you know? And they don't necessarily agree with each other -- it's sort of like the two-hour block of contradictions. But ... it really has been working out, and I'm glad that they decided to keep us there.

Q. Roswell is based on the books by Melinda Metz. Have you read any of them?
A. Yeah, when we first started the pilot, she only had three books out then, so I did, I read all three of them ... What those books did is they gave us a great idea and a great starting point. I mean, that basically laid out the stage for us to tell the story. Without the books, we wouldn't have a show. We've taken it in a much different direction, and we're going to continue to take it in that direction. . . Throughout the entire season, we were always trying to find that balance between relationships and characters, and action and suspense and mystery... And I think we found it towards the end of the season, and we're going to continue on with that darker, edgier, "X-Filian" tone.

Q. Is there any risk of losing the relationships and the emotional aspects that have been so crucial this season?
A. I hope not. I don't think it's going to happen. It wouldn't be the same show, and I know that a lot of people would not be happy... We're still going to have those relationships that we've developed in the first season. They're just going to become a little more complicated... At the end of the last season, we found out [the aliens] were actually engineered and they were put here on Earth for a specific purpose. ... I think the second season is going to be [Max's] struggle to either continue on with the life that he's built for himself in Roswell and the relationship with Liz (Shiri Appleby) and accepting his so-called destiny and responsibility, and let that take him where it leads him. So it'll be like the choice between being human or being alien.

Q. What do you think of him as a person?
A. I think generally he tries to be a good person and tries to make the right decisions, but I don't think he always does. What I like about him is that he does make mistakes, that he does sometimes leap before he really looks. That moment when he saves Liz in the CrashDown is a testament to how much he feels and cares about her, because if he'd stopped and thought about everybody who he would be putting at risk, that little hesitation might've cost her her life. Those little character choices speak louder than words sometimes.

Q. Do you have a favorite episode?
A. The last three episodes were my favorite of the season, for me as an actor... I really enjoyed this one that we did called "Max to the Max," where I got a chance to play what could've been a very uber-cheesy dual role (chuckling) -- by being this other shape-shifting alien who took on the guise of Max ... What I wanted to do was subtly give hints as to who they're watching, for people who are really paying attention, but not just give it away, not slam people over the head with it. So I gave [the other] Max a little different walk, he kind of prowled. He kind of had more of a sense of purpose in his walk, and [the real] Max was a little more tentative because he didn't really know what was going on... But my other favorite one was this one called "The White Room," where Max was captured by the FBI and tested and abused and tortured, and I thought that whole episode in and of itself was the strongest one because you're seeing somebody that you care about in pain and pretty much helpless.

Q. Do you have a favorite character?
A. I like everybody. ... I don't really have a specific character that I like more than others, but I really do enjoy watching Bill Sadler (Sheriff Jim Valenti) because in the beginning he was the antagonist. He was the one searching us out, but he had a reason, he was almost validated in his convictions. And so, to take a character like that, that people don't necessarily root for, and make him, not sympathetic but understandable in his actions, you understand why he's doing that. You really wish he didn't, it would be really nice if, uh, that mean, old sheriff would stop chasing around them three alien kids, but you understood why.

Q. You got an early start in acting. Something like age 5? What kind of things did that entail?
A. (Laughs) Not a lot of dialogue, that's for sure. I know that at age 5, I had done some theater. I don't know the name of the play, and neither does my mom, but I do know I played a sunflower.

Q. That was your first role?
A. Yeah, I remember just having like a green outfit on and a yellow headdress of some sort (laughs). But I continued to do theater pretty much up until I left for Los Angeles.

Q. So, why acting?
A. Why acting at that young age? I think my mom was trying to figure out something to do with me. Apparently I had a lot of childlike enthusiasm. Just a little. (Smiles) So she just wanted to focus my energies.

Q. Would you eventually like to go back to theater? Or is the big screen your ultimate goal?
A. I would love to do it all. If I had the opportunity to go back to either Minnesota or New York and do some theater, sure, I'd take that into consideration. I know a lot of people who are in my position do theater, I know a lot of people who have been in 20 different movies and still go back and do theater. And from a financial point of view, it's not smart for them because they're losing money by doing theater, but it's a passion.

Q. What are some of the basics you look for in roles?
A. First thing you look at is the story, are you telling a good story. Second thing is the people that you are involved with because you always want to work with interesting people and people who challenge you. And third is: Do I feel a connection with it? Do I feel some sort of affinity towards the story, towards the character?

Q. Would you consider directing?
A. Absolutely. I think it's a different responsibility, but the idea of being the ultimate storyteller, the ultimate decision-maker, and -- I should say the ultimate voice and hopefully the ultimate decision-maker -- is a challenge I would love to take on. . . You're the one with the paintbrush now, you're the guy with the paintbrush and the canvas, everybody else can add their color or multitudes of colors, but you're the guy holding the easel.

Q. What was your most humbling experience as an actor?
A. Probably just being an actor.

Q. And perhaps you already answered what would be your proudest moment as an actor ... would it be "The White Room"?
A. My finest moment as an actor was donning that sunflower outfit. I don't know why I'm still doing this, it must be just all downhill from there (laughs).










Hot July/Aug 2000

Birthdate: December 30 (Capricorn)

Hometown: Minneapolis, Minnesota

TV Guy: In addition to his role on Roswell, he's also had guest starring roles on 7th Heaven, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Dawson's Creek.

Short Story: I remember the moment I walked into high school. I was probably a good two feet smaller than every other guy in there.

Hot Dog: He has a brown spotted dalmation named Joplin.

Hot Dogger: Jason is a certified ski instructor.

Hot Band: If I could be in any band, I think it would have to be The Beatles. That would have been a lot of fun.

On "Roswell" he plays the quiet, mysterious Max Evans, but in person Jason Behr is far from reserved. Here he opens up about hisn ew celebrity status, describes his fantasy woman and clues us in on what he'll be doing down the Hollywood pike.

Jason Behr knows he's in a sick and unhealthy relationship, but he doesn't care. He's in love. "The first time I got some, I had this epiphany, like, 'Where have you been all my life?' It's like I can't get enough," says the 26-year-old star of the WB's teen alien drama "Roswell." No, he's not talking about Michelle Williams, whom he romanced on "Dawson's Creek," or Sarah Michelle Gellar, with whom he sparred on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," or even Shiri Appleby, his lip-locking partner on "Roswell." No, Jason's talking about donuts. "Every Sunday for months, my buddies and I would drive for over an hour to the nearest Krispy Kreme," he says. "Once there we would watch the donuts from conception to birth on this huge apparatus, the donut-birthing machine. Then as soon as we bit into them, the trumpets would blare, the angels would sing and the sun would shine."

Though there weren't any trumpets, Behr received a pretty friendly welcome when he arrived in Hollywood from Minneapolis eight years ago, fresh out of high school. Within days of stepping off the plane, he had an agent and a manager and began hitting the audition trail. After a series of guest spots on TV shows, he landed "Roswell," which has not only won him the hearts of young things everywhere, it's great potential for a big-screen career. Will he soon find himself starring in films, like his networkmates from "Dawson's Creek"? It's too soon to say. But one thing's for sure -- this Behr bears watching.

Dennis Hensley: I can't get over your donut obsession. How many do you put away in one sitting?
A box of 12 easily, in the blink of an eye. I've gotta watch it. I can go overboard.

Have you been a donut addict since childhood?
No. I discovered them when I was shooting 'Dawson's Creek' in North Carolina. Every weekend I'd pig out on donuts and when I'd come back to L.A. I'd have withdrawals.

Where did you grow up?
All over, from Minneapolis to Arizona to California. My parents liked to move around a lot. After they split up, we settled down in Richfield, near Minneapolis, where I went to high school.

Did you always feel like the new kid?
Yeah. You want to make friends yet you know you're probably going to have to leave anyway. We never got a chance to grow our roots down so we grew them sideways. That's why my family's pretty close. I have three brothers: one older and two younger, and an 11 year-old sister from my dad's second marriage, who just came out here to visit.

Your sister must think it's so cool that you're on this hot teen show.
[laughs] Well, she's like 11 going on 35. She's always been honest with me about my work. When I was starting out, I was playing all these jerks. After I was on "Dawson's" she called me up and asked, "When are you ever not going to play a creep?" I thought that was hilarious.

What's your favorite memory of being on "Dawson's Creek?
"Hanging out off set with the cast. We had a blast. Here I was this new kid and they had already been on the show for a year and instead of being standofish, they were incredibly nice.

Did you being on "Dawson's Creek" contribute to you getting the "Roswell" job because they're both on the WB?
It had nothing to do with it. "Roswell" was originally going to be on Fox.

What made you want to be on "Roswell," besides the fact that it was a major gig?
When I first read the script, I immediately understood what they were going for -- the mystery, the suspense, the relationships, the unrequited love story. I related to Max's search for the truth about himself, about life, about his place in this world, which I think everybody goes through.

This season you had some heavy make-out scenes with your costar, Shiri Appleby. What are those like to shoot?
It's always an odd thing, but Shiri and I have gotten to know each other so well over the last nine months that there's nothing uncomfortable about it.

Are we going to get more romance in upcoming episodes?
More everything. The stakes are raised. Everything's bigger, faster, stronger and more intense, emotionally and physically. Everything that they knew to be true in their lives comes crumbling down around them, piece by piece.

Has the success of the show led to any movie offers?
I've been reading a lot of scripts, trying to figure out the right one. I'll only choose a movie if I like the story and the actors and directors involved. If the only reason you're picking a movie is because you think it's going to make you a movie star and make a lot of money, then you're missing something. You have to be willing to take a risk and stand naked in front of everybody. And if I make a mistake, then, big deal. I'll learn from it and movie on. It's not about how fast you can attain something, it's about the trip to get there.

Do you feel pressure to capitalize on the heat that you have now?
No. I don't want to work just for the sake of working.

What actors do you look up to?
Paul Newman. He's the definition of class. His career has spanned generations, he's always challenged himself and delivered great performances. He's been married to the same woman for years, and he makes a hell of a Caesar salad dressing.

Speaking of women, are you dating someone now?
No. I'm so focused on "Roswell," it's kind of unfair to anybody to get involved. I say that now, but I could go off tomorrow and meet the right person. You just know when you know.

What kind of qualities do you look for in a girlfriend?
Someone who has convictions, yet is open-minded enough to appreciate others for theirs.

If you could be a girl for a day, what would you want to experience?
[Laughs] I can't answer that. My mother would kill me.










Jason Behr Interview From Teen Movieline - Sept 2000

Behr Facts: Born: 30 December 1973 in Minneapolis, Minnesota
Films: Rites of Passage (1999) and Pleasantville (1998)
TV Shows besides "Roswell":
"Step by Step" (1994)
"Pacific Blue" (1996)
"JAG" (1995)
"Sherman Oaks" (1995)
"Profiler" (1996)
"Cracker" (1997)
"Buffy the Vampire Slayer" (1997)
"7th Heaven" (1996)
"Push" (1998)
"Dawson's Creek" (1998)

Behring It All Again!

"Roswell" alien Jason Behr already told us about his dream woman, his favorite guilty pleasure (donuts) and his plans for the future. What more could he possibly tell us? Plenty.
Q: Do you ever visit your fan sites?
A: I've wanted to but I have to go over to someone's house to do that. I'm pretty computer illiterate. It's great if people want to create sites because they're passionate about the show and they make some really cool web sites.

Q: Have you ever actually been to Roswell, New Mexico?
A: No. I was going to go to but instead I read a lot of books and watched a lot a videos.

Q: Whats the creepiest thing you found out in your research?
A: That it's not just a couple of people who said they saw UFOs here and there. It was a lot more than you'd venture to guess.

Q: Do you have to work to stay in shape or is it natural?
A: I like to play basketball and run but I eat a lot of crap. Like donuts, of course.

Q: What's the most trouble you ever got into in school?
A: One teacher said something in class and I didn't really understand why it was right so I called her on it and she didn't like being questioned so I had to go talk to the principal.

Q: When you first moves to L.A. did you have any connections?
A: I'd met a manager in Minneapolis and he said, "When you get out to L.A. give me a call." So I came out here with 200 bucks to my name, called this manager and he referred me to an agent. I met this agent and the day after that I was auditioning for stuff. I really lucked out with the way it all happened because I got here in the middle of pilot season and they were seeing anybody who looked under 18.

Q: What's been your favorite star sighting since moving to L.A.?
A: Bob Hope at the supermarket flirting with all the girls in a very Bob Hope kind of way.

Q: You had a small part in Pleasantville. Were you in black and white or color?
A: I was in color.

Q: Did the people in color feel superior to people in black and white?
A: (Laughs) No. I was only in it for two minutes in a scene with Reese Witherspoon who was really, really nice. It was a great opportunity but if you get up and go get popcorn, you miss me.

Q: On a film do you like doing your own stunts?
A: Oh, absolutely. You never want anybody else to act like they're you jumping off a building or driving a car 120 miles an hour. You want to do it yourself.










In Step with JASON BEHR
Parade Magazine
by James Brady, Oct 15, 2000

A year ago, one of the big hits at the upstart WB network was the premiere of an hour-long series called "Roswell." What at first seemed like just another teen romance turned out to be more complicated and nuanced than that. The show was built around the premise that a spaceship really did crash in Roswell, N.M., in 1947, as some believe. And inside were pods from which aliens emerged years later, growing up to look like normal (if extraordinarily handsome) American high school kids.

Now they're back for a second season on Monday nights. Jason Behr – a 26-year-old from Minneapolis who plays Max Evans – usually is described as the "brooding" alien on the show. Apparently he is also something of a heartthrob among teenage girls, and he proved to be an articulate spokesman for "Roswell."

"What we did the first season was develop the situation and introduce the characters," said Behr (pronounced 'bear'). "Now we've assembled a new writing staff and are going in a different direction, more sci-fi. Any show has to constantly change to keep it fresh."

Will the cast change? "There are new characters acting as catalysts," said Jason. "but the existing characters are exhibiting new facets. For example, Max last year learned of his responsibilities as a human. This year, he'll explore his responsibilities as an alien. We have a lot of freedom with the show's context, because aliens have a 'sense-memory recall.' There'll also be a few flashbacks."

Was he a big sci-fi fan as a kid? "Everyone my age grew up with 'Star Wars, E.T., Star Trek,' " Jason said. "But I also read sci-fi books. I spent a lot of time traveling in a van [his family moved frequently, and his parents later separated]. I didn't spend much time indoors. I rolled around in the dirt, but at the same time I was reading 'The Hobbit' and 'The Lord of the Rings.' "

Before "Roswell," Jason did guest spots on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "Dawson's Creek," and "7th Heaven." He also had the starring role in an ABC series called "Push" that swiftly vanished. Is "Roswell" likely to endure? "The WB renewed all its series for 13 weeks [about half a season]," Jason said. "But we're confident we'll get a full season."

I was curious what he thought of "3rd Rock from the Sun," another successful series, though a comedy, featuring aliens from space. "I really liked it and used to watch," he said "but when you're doing a n hour show, it's tough to watch a lot of TV."

Brady's Bits

Straight out of high school, Jason Behr flew to L.A., where he now lives, intent on breaking into acting. "I'd acted in commercials around Minneapolis," Jason said, "and when I was near graduation, a light went on: Acting was something I had to do, not just wanted to do. I was accepted at USC, but then I was caught in a 'Catch-22.' My mom made too much money for me to qualify for a loan but not enough to pay for college. Then a skateboarding buddy calls me out of the blue and says he lost his roommate, and do I want to move to LA? So, with $300 in my pocket, I get on a plane. The night I arrive, it's dark and raining, and I'm disoriented. Then I get in the house and turn on the news. There's a murder, a mudslide, and there are fires in Malibu. I said, 'What the hell did I get myself into?' But now I appreciate LA." Jason has three brothers and one sister. "She's 11 going on 30," he said, "and she's like a weed. She must've grown a foot this year."

Personal:

Born Dec. 30, 1973, in Minneapolis.

Films: Include "Pleasantville," 1998; "Rites of Passage," 1999.

Television: Includes "Step by Step," 1994; "Sherman Oaks," 1995; "Alien Nation: Millennium," 1996; "JAG," 1997; "Profiler," 1997; "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," 1997; "7th Heaven," 1997; "Cracker," 1997; "Push," 1998; "Dawson's Creek," 1998-99; "Roswell," 1999-










JASON BEHR - STAR, OCTOBER 18, 2000

Jason Behr, 26, best known as Max Evans, one of Roswell High's resident aliens, is in love - and it's an unhealthy relationship. "It's like I can't get enough," he says. No, he's not talking about Michelle Williams, who he romanced on Dawson's Creek, or Sarah Michelle Gellar, his feisty sparring partner on Buffy, or even Shiri Appleby, his lip-locking love interest on Roswell. Instead, he's in love with...doughnuts. "I can put away a box of 12 in the blink of an eye," he claims.

When he arrived in Hollywood from Minneapolis eight years ago, fresh out of high school, Behr received a pretty friendly welcome. Within days of stepping off the plane, he had an agent and a manager and began hitting the audition trail. After a series of TV guest-spots, he landed Roswell High, which has gained him loads of respect from casting agents who see great potential for a big-screen career. [Star] caught up with the rising star in LA.

star: What made you choose to do Roswell High?

When I first read the script, I completely understood what they were going for - the mystery, the suspense, the relationships, the unrequited love story. I related to Max's search for the truth about himself, about life, about his place in this world, which I think everybody goes through.

star: You've already acted in two movies (Pleasantville + Rights of Passage). Any new movie plans?

I've been reading a lot of scripts, trying to figure out the right one. I'll only choose a movie if I like the story and the actors and directors involved. If the only reason you pick a movie is because you think it's going to make you a star or a lot of money, you're missing something. You have to be willing to take a risk and stand naked in front of everybody. And if I make a mistake, then...big deal! It's not about how fast you can attain something, it's about the trip to get there.

star: Things are really hotting up on-screen between Max + Liz. Do you have a girlfriend?

No. I'm so focused on Roswell High, it's kind of unfair to anybody to get involved. I say that now, but I could go off tomorrow and meet the right person. You just know when you know.

star: What would happen in your fantasy episode of Roswell High?

We go to the Bahamas where we have our own private beach, then Max gets lost in the jungle, only to be rescued by Catherine Zeta Jones!

star: Michael Douglas may not be too happy about that! Your character is a virgin, right?

Yeah. The first time he ever kissed anybody was when he kissed Liz (Shiri Appleby) and they had such an intense connection. I can't imagine what would happen if they ever had sex.

star: Were you a hit with girls at school?

You've gotta be kidding - at first, not at all. I remember being very short. I felt like a little boy walking among men. It was like I was in the wrong school. Finally, when I was a junior, I shot up.

star: We've read some online comments from fans praising your ears.

Really? I don't think they stick out that much. But if fans like them, then that's a good thing.

star: What's your idea of a perfect day?

At this point, the perfect day would be to get up in the afternoon, grab a bowl of Cocoa Pebbles and watch Thundercats and Robotech on the Cartoon Network for four or five hours.










Cosmically Cool Capricorn , Teen Magazine Interview - Nov 2000

Jason Behr has a serious shy guy quality. He's soft spoken watchful, and has a smart reflective way of respondng to questions. He also thinks astrology can forsee his life path about as accurately as stepping on a crack will brake your mama's back. But that didn't stop us from charting what the stars have to say about this guarded non-believer.

Susan:"Jason is a capricorn so he's cautious by nature. He's reserved, careful and doesn't do things on impulse".

Jason:"Im into fast cars I like to go fast. I drove a stock car once up at Californa speedway. There's something about the fact that you're close to your death that I like. The speed and going so fast.....some people don't like it. I do."

Teen:"What's the ultimate car?

Jason:"Porsche. Germans make nice cars"

Susan:"Jason is very loyal,nurturing and big-hearted."

Jason:"My dog, an Akita is like my kid. His name is Ronin and he's a big dog. I take him with me wherever I can. His name comes from a dark comic book I used to read when I was a kid. I had picked him out from a litter,but I had the name Ronin in my head for a long time,so he was named Ronin before he was born."

Susan:"His planets are in the money house and he was born with Pluto on the mid-heaven,which is unbelievably amazing for carrer success. He's all about television or the internet."

Jason:"I'm into movies. Someimtes people forget about old movies,and so our generation, I don't think is that aware of them. Although it was a diferent style of acting back then some of it might be perceived as over the top. But I think the classic stories an the classic movies are very relatable today. I love The Godfather. Power,family,loyalty. Thoes kinds of themes are important to me."

Teen:"Do you ever feel limited by the demands of a televison show ?"

Jason:"We're allowed some freedoms because were dealing with alien nature and not human nature. But we have to keep something that the audience can relate to in order to keep them emotionally invested. There is a lot of real human emotion in these charcters."

Teen:"Do you think Roswell equates the problems of being an alien with the problems of being a teen?"

Jason:"Those themes,alienation and feeling on the outside or misunderstood,thinking nobody really gets where you're coming from,are the same. You're constantly searching for yourself and your place in the world. Those things apply to just about everybody. But I think they mostly apply to adolescents. It's not about finding a home so much as finding yourself".

Susan:"Jason has to be careful when he's doing business. There is a possibility of misscommunication because his world view is different. He knows that everyone doesn't think the same way, but he doesn't know that everyone involved in his work isn't always articulating what they have in mind."

Jason: "Roswell is a lot of hard work but there are times wehn I feel like the writing,the directing...it all jsut comes together. My favorite episode was the 'White Room'. The room itself was very small: no windows, one door. In this tiny room, there was crew, cameras,actors and props,and then I had to act as if I was in there completely alone. Nobody else. It was a long day, a very long process and very claustrophobic. I'm not claustrophobic, but it was a small,confined space."

Teen:"When they're directing you and you're tired, in this box, hot and just over it all, are there any actors tricks you use to get the job done"?

Jason:"Once they shut the door to that room, there was no air. i don't think anybody who as there in that room was bummed that there was an absence of bean dip on the set that day! But, OK for the 'White Room' they had to pick me up and throw me in the room. Every time we did it, I'm telling the guy 'Don't gently shut the clasp. I want you to slam it shut-shove my hand in the thing!' Every time he did he pinched my skin. I was bleeding from my wrists, but it worked for the scene."

Teen: "That's intense. Tell us what superpower you would have if you really were an alien"?

Jason: "I'd fly. I'm sure it's a very poopular answer, but there's a reason for it. It would be complete freedom."










SUGAR MAGAZINE-November 2000
--Conducted by Leo Roberts and Steve Gidlow

You've gone from "Dawson's Creek" to "Roswell High" - which did you like the best?
"Dawson's was such a great show to work on! They have such a great crew and I guess I do kinda miss them all. But I have this show now and I love it!"
What did you like most about Dawson's?
"It gave me great exposure and the whole experience was a lot of fun. My character, Chris, wasn't the nicest of guys in Capeside, but Wilmington, [North Carolina] where the show is filmed, is a beautiful place to work and the people there were so friendly."
What's brilliant about "Roswell High"'s character Max?
"He's caring, thoughtful and is just trying to [deal with] the changes in his life. Everyone goes through that, so he's kinda like me, but an Alien!"
What's the vibe with your Roswell co-stars?
"The whole cast is just fantastic. We all really bonded and got along great right from the start." Roswell's actually a real-life town in New Mexico, where aliens have supposedly been sighted - have you been to the real Roswell? "No, but we were all talking about goin' there the other day! We all want to do a big field trip down there and check it out. It'd be a bit like doing some research, y'know? We could go and check out the actual crash site and talk to people who really live there. That would be so cool!"
So Jason, do you think aliens really exist?
"I don't know! I do believe that there's something out there, but I'm not sure they're little green men. Who really knows for sure? I don't, but I guess I do believe we can't be the only intelligent life form that ever existed in the universe."
Were you always a big sci-fi fan?
"Yes! The film 'ET' had a profound impact on me when I was a child. I really enjoyed movies like that. I think everyone likes the fantasy of it all, wondering whether there could be other intelligent life forms out there. It's fascinating."
Have you ever had a close encounter with any extraterrestrial types?
"Not lately, but if I do ever see any aliens, I promise you'll be the first ones to know!"










Teen magazine interview - Nov 2000 Roswell superstars revealing astrocasts

What's in the stars for these heavenly creatures? - Hey girlies! Do you believe in astrology? How 'bout aliens? We had personal astro-readings done on alien babes Jason Behr, Katherine Heigl and Brendan Fehr. Katherine was totally into it (we had fun too, girl!) but Brendan was a non-believer and Jason would have none of it. On page 48, see their out-of-this-world photos and find out their trippy career and love predictions.

cosmically-cool capricorn

Jason Behr has a serious shy-guy quality. He's soft-spoken, watchful, and has a smart, reflective way of responding to questions. He also thinks astrology can foresee his life's path about as accurately as stepping on a crack will break your mama's back. But that didn't stop us from charting what the stars have to say about this guarded, non-believer

Susan: "Jason is a Capricorn, so he's cautious by nature. He's reserved, careful and doesn't do things on impulse."

Jason: "I'm into fast cars. I like to go fast. I drove a stock car once up at California Speedway. There's something about the fact that you're that close to death that I like. The speed and going so fast... Some people don't like it, I do."

Teen: "What's the ultimate car?"

Jason: "Porsche, Germans make nice cars."

Susan: "Jason is very loyal, nurturing and big-hearted."

Jason: "My dog, an Akita, is like my kid. His name is Ronin and he's a big dog. I take him with me wherever I can. His name comes from a dark comic book I used to read when I was a kid. I had picked him out from a litter, but I had the name Ronin in my head for a long time, so he was named Ronin before he was born."

Susan: "His planets are in the money house and he ws born with Pluto on the mid-heaven, which is unvelievably amazing for career success. He's all about television or the Internet."

Jason: "I'm into movies. Sometimes people forget about old movies, and so our generation, I don't think, is that aware of them. Although it was a different style of acting back then, some of it might be perceived as over the top. But I think the classic stories and the classic movies are very relatable today. I love the Godfather. Power, family, loyalty. Those kinds of themes are important to me.

Teen: "Do you ever feel limited by the demands of a television show?"

Jason: "We're allowed some freedoms because we're dealing with alien nature and not human nature. But we have to keep something that the audience can relate to in order to keep them emotionally invested. There is a lot of real human emotion in these characters."

Teen: "Do you think Roswell equates the problems of being an alien with the problems of being a teen?"

Jason: "Those themes, alienation and feeling on the outside or misunderstood, thinking nobody really gets where you're coming from, are the same. You're constantly searching for yourself and your place in this world. Those things apply to just about everybody. But I think they mostly apply to adolescents. It's not about finding a home so much as finding yourself."

Susan: "Jason has to be careful when he's doing business. There's a probability of miscommunication becuase his world view is different. He knows that everyone doesn't think the same way, but he doesn't know that everyone involved in his work isn't always articulating what they have in mind."

Jason: "Roswell is a lot of hard work, but there are times when I feel like the writing, the directing... it all just comes together. My favorite episode was the "White Room." The room itself was very small: no windows, one door. In this tiny room, there was crew, cameras, actors and props, and then I had to act as if I was in there completely alone. Nobody else. It was a long day, a very long process and very claustrophobic. I'm not claustrophobic, but it was a small, confined space."

Teen: "When they're directing you and you're tired, in this box, hot and just over it all, are there any actor's tricks you use to get the job done?"

Jason: "Once they shut the door to that room, there was no air. I don't think anybody who was there in that room was bummed that there was an absence of bean dip on the set that day! But, OK, for the "White Room" they had to pick me up and throw me in the room. Every time we did it, I'm telling the guy "Don't gently shut the clasp. I want you to slam it shut--shove my hand in the thing!" Every time he did he pinched my skin. I was bleeding from my wrists, but it worked for the scene."

Teen: "That's intense. Tell us what superpower you would have if you really were an alien."

Jason: "I'd fly. I'm sure it's a very popular answer, but there's a reason for it. It would be complete freedom.










Jason Behr Talks About Roswell
Nov 30/00 2:00p by Ian Spelling

God rest ye merry gentlebeings, it's time for an otherworldly holiday episode on "Roswell.''

"It's called 'A Roswell Christmas Carol,''' says Jason Behr, who stars as the alien leader Max Evans on the resurgent sci-fi series. "Max witnesses a horrible accident, and is forced to decide very quickly whether or not he should save this man (former soap-opera star John Littlefield) without anyone seeing him.

"His decision not to save the man starts to get the best of him,'' the actor continues, "and his conscience and the ghost of the man he let die come to haunt him. Basically, it's about the fact that his power to heal is this huge onus unto itself.

"If there is a master plan, is Max disturbing it? Or is Max a part of that master plan? Either way, is he taking it upon himself to play God? So his guilt over his decision drives him to question his own ethics.''

The episode, which WB will air on Dec. 18, represents a bit of a throwback to the first season of "Roswell.'' Last year's shows were paced leisurely and touched on personal issues more often than has been the case in such full-throttle second-season entries as "Skin & Bones,'' "Harvest,'' "Wipe Out!'' and the recent "Dupes'' duo, which blasted through stories about the Skins, Congresswoman Whitaker, Nasedo and Courtney.

"We've been doing a lot of sci-fi episodes, shows that have been based on the alien mythology,'' Behr says by telephone from his trailer on the Paramount Pictures lot in Hollywood. "Every so often we do one that has much more of a heartbeat to it, that's more about the human side of the aliens. Granted, Max has this special gift that he's still not sure is a blessing or a curse, but I don't think this is so esoteric that people won't relate to it.''

While the ratings are up significantly, some loyal fans don't love the show's makeover. Born a romantic drama with a sci-fi element, "Roswell'' is now a sci-fi/action series with a romantic element.

Behr, for one, says he welcomed the changes.

"When you're trying to find the right balance for a show, you're really given the opportunity to somewhat reinvent the show,'' he says. "We took all of the characters and let them grow and got to know them over the course of an entire year. Now we can put them in extreme situations, and hopefully people will care about what happens to them.

"Also, we can sort of break the rules and break the mold,'' he adds. "I think you get to know someone's true character and integrity by the choices that they make in certain circumstances. Sometimes our characters don't make the decisions that you might think they would. So it kind of keeps you interested and keeps you guessing.''

Any way you dissect it, whether it's Max romancing his beloved Liz (Shiri Appleby) or Max, a/k/a Zan, giving fellow ETs Isabel (Katherine Heigl), Michael (Brendan Fehr) and Tess (Emilie de Ravin) their marching orders, Max remains "Roswell's'' main man, the guy with the weight of the entire universe on his shoulders.

Likewise, one might assume, Behr is called upon to carry the show. But the actor disagrees.

"I don't look at it as being a huge responsibility,'' he says. "They give me the scripts, tell me where to stand and what to say, and I just get in there and do it.

"If the show were to go away tomorrow,'' he adds, "it wouldn't be the end of the world for me, and I don't think it would be the end of the world for any of the other actors on the show. They are all very talented and have futures ahead of them as well.

"But I don't think 'Roswell' will ever be a job,'' Behr hastens to add. "As soon as what I do becomes a job and it's no longer fun, I might as well just give up. If you're not having fun, it's just not worth it.''

Provider: New York Times Syndicate
Copyright: c. Ian Spelling










Close Encounters of the Behr Kind
December 2000

Here's a post on the "roswell 2 board" over at the fanforum that I thought was cute! It was posted by RamBill and the subject was "jason waved to me today"

... and that was after I talked to him.

Jason is a member of the same gym that I belong to here in Los Angeles. I've seen him there a number of times and have talked to him briefly once before. Today I got to talk to him again, as well as, observe his workout routine. I am a private fitness trainer here in L.A. and have been one for 20 years. I was curious to see what exactly Jason does to maintain his outstanding physique. You don't look like he does by accident. It takes a lot of hard work.

Here's what happened--

At around 11:00 a.m. I had finished the weight lifting part of my workout and went into the locker room to get something to read while I did my cardio work. When I came out of the locker room and headed for the Elliptical training machines, there he was, with his brother.

Here's what Jason was wearing:

* Black Nike shorts that came down to just above the knee.
* White T-shirt that had some kind of a dragon logo on the back. Sleeves were cut off, exposing his arms.
* Grey New Balance running shoes
* Black Nike baseball hat.

Jason and his brother (who has been with Jason every time I've seen him working out) were working on Elliptical machines number 1 and 2. Machine number 4 was open and I got on it. I worked for 25 minutes, while Jason did 30. Jason worked very hard. He was really going strong, sweating a lot.

When I was finished, I moved on to a Stairmaster for another 25 minutes.

When Jason finished his 30 minutes on the Elliptical machine he went on to do about 10 minutes of stretching about ten feet away from me. Jason is VERY,VERY flexible for a man. He can sit with his legs extended straight out, grab his toes, and touch his nose to his knees, no problem. He can almost, but not quite, do both front and side splits. He can sit with his legs spread out wide and touch his chest to the floor. That degree of flexibility puts him ahead of 99% of the male population, including this male. That level of flexibility can come in handy in both outdoor AND indoor sports, ladies. If you know what I mean.

After his stretching, Jason went on to some weight lifting. He worked on his deltoids (shoulder cap muscles) and triceps (back of the upper arms) primarily. He also did some work on abdominal and lower back machines. This was a fairly light workout. It wasn't very extensive. Jason must be doing a split routine (working different body parts on different days), because he did nothing for his chest, biceps, back, or legs.

I got done a few minutes before Jason and was in the locker room just finishing getting my stuff out of the locker when he walked in. His locker was right next to mine. As he was unlocking his lock, I said, "You're Jason, right?" He said yes and asked me my name and shook my hand. I told him that I had recognized him from the show. He said they had some time off from shooting over the holidays. I sarcastically asked him how he could stand working with all those unattractive women on the show. He laughed and said it was real tough putting up with that. I said it was nice meeting him and I walked out.

When I was driving out of the parking lot I stopped to let a SUV back out of its spot. It was Jason. After he backed out he went past me going the other way. As he went by he smiled and waved. I did the same in return.

Comments-
This was the second time I've briefly talked to Jason. In both instances he immediately asked my name and shook my hand. It seems like a small thing, but it shows manners and class. Things that seem ever so rare these days. Jason gives off a very friendly and positive vibe. There was no attitude, no air of superiority that many celebrities give off. He seems very real and down-to-earth. The fact that he waved to me in the parking lot is further evidence of his friendly nature.

If I see Jason again, it will be interesting to see if he recognizes me, or remembers me. The first time I talked to him was 4 months ago and he didn't remember me today. If I see him in the next few weeks, there's a chance he might remember. I'd like to talk to him more about his overall workout routine. Hey, maybe I could become his fitness trainer!! Wouldn't that be something.










Jason Behr Chat
Date: Feb 19, 2001

TV Guide on AOL presented a chat with Jason Behr of "Roswell." Jason answered AOL members' questions about his character, Max, what he thinks of his fans, and more.

Dan: Welcome to everyone, and welcome to AOL Live's chat with Jason Behr, star of "Roswell," which airs on Mondays at 9 on The WB. Thanks for being here with us, Jason. For those who may not know, give us a brief description of what the show is about and who your character is.
Jason Behr: ...who go through life [as] teenagers. I play Max. He found out that he was [not] of this planet sometime in the second season, which started the alien mythology.

Dan: One of our members has a question: Will Max and Liz be getting back together this season?
Jason Behr: I am not actually sure how that is going to go, the relationship between -- the two of them have been through so much. I'm not sure what they are going to do.
Jason Behr: I've been acting quite a bit since I was a kid -- a way for me to channel my youthful exuberance, I guess. I had a lot of energy when I was a kid.

Question: If you weren't acting, what would you see yourself doing?
Jason Behr: Probably -- I really have no idea. That is the only thing I can do.
Jason Behr: ...for a balance between the two of them. When we have a story that involves both the darky, edgy science fiction elements and the relationships, those are the most interesting stories. When you have too much of either one of them, you can turn off certain viewers. It's nice to have a balance between the two of them.
Jason Behr: I think high school is such an important part of a lot of people's lives, either good or bad. I think high school [leaves] very lasting impressions, whether they like it or don't like it. It also helps when you are walking through lockers, have a backpack -- the environment sort of works on the stage -- and sort of remember those times.

Question: Do you enjoy fame, or would you prefer an ordinary life?
Jason Behr: To be honest, I am working so much, I'm really not outside just hanging out and on the streets, I really work all the hours on the show.

Dan: What's it like being recognized out in public? Are you bothered by people coming up to you?
Jason Behr: If anyone ever comes up and says anything, it's usually very complimentary, and that kind of stuff usually puts a smile on your face.

Question: What has been your favorite episode this season and last?
Jason Behr: It's a toss-up from either -- the pilot has been my favorite. The first episode was very powerful. All the actors gave real strong performances. I thought there was a nice balance of the comedy between Michael and his battle, and the drama of Max's situation, and the stranger that he let die. I think that was one of the more powerful episodes.

Question: Do you relate to your character in any way?
Jason Behr: Sometimes. There is always a little bit of yourself in the characters that you play. You forget about who you are when you're playing these characters. I think Max is a little more indecisive, and understandably so -- he has the weight of the world on his shoulders. He is a little shy, a little hesitant and a little indecisive.

Dan: On the show, you've not only played Max Evans, but also a New York version of Max, a future version of Max, and an army officer in 1947. Is it liberating to be able to play different charactes within the same show?
Jason Behr: Absolutely. Whenever you are doing a season of a series, you are playing the same character over and over again, it's always refreshing to do something different. The New York version of Max, I was only on there for the very first minute of the show. I think all the actors were going for a very different take on their New York counterparts. I think the general idea was to take these characters and kind of play What If -- what if they grew up without parental supervision, sort of free reign with their abilities. Quite different characters, quite different animals.

Question: Do you know if there is a sure third season to Roswell?
Jason Behr: We don't know yet. Nobody has told us if we are or are not coming back. It's always an issue when we come near the end of the season. I don't know of any of these shows that have been picked up for the next season. Well, the fans were very helpful last year, allowing people to really see it. The show is being watched, and... it should stick around, but I'm not sure.

Question: Jason, have you learned anything about yourself while playing Max? If so, what did you learn?
Jason Behr: I learned that I need a lot more sleep than I get. I've learned that. I guess Max has a certain humanity that is both frustrating and refreshing, because I think he sees the world through different eyes than I do. I guess I've learned to be a little more open-minded about things, always have a better question about who he is and what he isn't.

Question: Who do you admire the most in the world, living or dead?
Jason Behr: First and foremost, my mother. A lot of beliefs in me and values that I use every day -- she's been my hero as long as I can remember. Other than that, career-wise, I admire Paul Newman, probably who stands out most. No particular film -- every film that he does, he is amazing in. I can't think of one film that he has done that I said I didn't like his performance. If I look at someone's career that mirrors that, it would be Paul Newman. He is a true representative of class. He makes a helluva salad dressing. More money is made on Newman's brand name than his films, and all the money his company makes goes to charity. To me, that is doing something with who you are.

Question: Hey, Jason, I want to be an actor on TV just like you! What advice can you give me to pursue my dream in television?
Jason Behr: The best advice that I could probably give anybody -- to believe in themselves. Don't let anyone tell you that things are not possible, because they are possible.

Dan: Now before "Roswell," you had some memorable guest-starring roles on two WB shows, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Dawson's Creek." What were those experiences like? At the time you were on those shows, did you have any inkling that the network might want to give you a starring role in a new show?
Jason Behr: I kind of just happened. I was in North Carolina when I read the script for Roswell. The character was so different than the one I was playing on that show.

Dan: Were you into scf-fi at all before you started on "Roswell"?
Jason Behr: I think anybody around my age was into science fiction at my age -- Star Wars, ET, Battlestar Galactica, -- it was kind of normal to be a science fiction buff. To that degree, it fascinated me.


Dan: As I'm sure you know, there are a ton of websites out there about "Roswell," as well as sites just about you. Have you ever checked out those sites?
Jason Behr: The Internet fascinates me. It allows people to exchange information so freely. Its innovative and scary at the same time, because sometimes I wonder how much of this information is true. You have to consider the source. So weird -- I can talk with somebody in Japan.... The technology is great, but I am not quite comfortable with it, and I don't surf the Net as often as I should.

Dan: What's it like knowing that there are all those people out there following your career, putting up pictures of you, gossiping about you. Is it at all flattering, or is it just creepy?
Jason Behr: Absolutely, it's very flattering. They don't need to do this, they don't need to spend the time doing this... it's very flattering. It's kind of surreal. I never expected that kind of stuff when I got into this. It's very flattering.

Question: Are you good friends with the cast? Who's your favorite?
Jason Behr: It's funny, the very first few months before we started working on the show, we hung out a lot. We decided to get to know each other before we started working those long hours. We found ourselves spending so much time on the set that when we would leave the set, we would go live our own lives. We've been getting a lot better as we've sort of got used to the schedule. We are hanging out a lot more now than we have in a long time.

Dan: Do you ever play any pranks on your costars to stay loose on the set?
Jason Behr: Not really .. we're pretty good to each other. There's no real super huge pranks or anything like that. Every now and then, that might have happened. We have a thing that we could.... Some of the cast members just get more fiber.

Question: Do you have another passion, aside from acting?
Jason Behr: I like to spend a lot of time with my family. It's the most important thing to me. But I spend a lot of time outdoors with my family and my dog, spend a lot of time with my dog. I like to play basketball a lot. I'm really a student of film; I really enjoy the film process. I watch as many movies as I can, when I have free time.

Dan: How far in advance is the cast of show told about upcoming storylines, upcoming character developments? For example, do you know yet what'll happen on the season finale?
Jason Behr: It depends on -- the beginning of the season, you pretty much know what is going on the first half of the year. Things keep popping up; you have no idea. I could not tell you what is happening in the next episode. Other than the one we are shooting right now, I don't know what is happening.

Question: Jason, I love you! My name is Adriana, and my question is, what do you think is the hardest scene youve done on Roswell?
Jason Behr: There are two kinds of really difficult scenes. They are the ones that are physically draining -- like there is this one scene where I had to run through the streets of Roswell. We probably started shooting around 1:00 and didn't stop shooting until 6 in the morning. All I did was run -- no dialogue, just running. That was very physically draining. There are also ones that are emotionally draining, like when Max heels the children in the hospital. Me -- just being there, and the whole idea of trying to give these kids the gift back -- it was very emotionally draining to me.

Question: What's the hardest part of Max's personality for you to portray?
Jason Behr: Probably his decision-making. A lot of times -- what frustrates me about the character, a lot of times he is so cautious and so thoughtful of things, he doesn't know which way to go. He sometimes can be so cautious, almost paralyzing. He doesn't do anything. He needs to be more active and make decisions right along. At least he could say that he made a judgment.

Question: Any movies on the horizon?
Jason Behr: Right now, most of my focus is on the show. I would love to do films. I enjoy watching films, as I said before. I enjoy the whole process of it. When I get the opportunity to move into that venue, I will. Right now, the scripts I've been reading, the stories that are being told, are not the most unique stories out there. I'm just waiting for the right one.

Dan: Is there anything you can tell us about what will happen on the show later this season?
Jason Behr: There are some things that are going to happen in the next few episodes that really do change the lives of all these kids, some things that are going to come up that aren't really expected, or expected in a way that none of them are really ready for.

Dan: Have there been times when you've read a script for an episode and just thought, Wow, I can't believe what Max is doing ... ?
Jason Behr: Probably when Max sang. I couldn't believe they did that to him. There is this episode called End of the World -- this future version of Max comes back to present-day Roswell to break up Liz and Max. The younger Max tries to sing to her, and I was really surprised by that. I knew Max couldn't sing, so I don't know why he was.

Question: Have you heard anything about viewers wanting Roswell to bring the core characters and relationships back as the focus of the show? Are there plans to guide Roswell back into that direction?
Jason Behr: These Hybrid Chronicles are pretty science fiction-based. We are going to slow it down a bit and find out how it affected the characters, swing it back the other way.

Dan: Is it cool knowing that you and the rest of the cast were hip to Dido before anyone else?
Jason Behr: It's interesting, because when we were first doing the pilot, we heard some temp music of what the theme was going to be. We didn't want that thing like Dawsons Creek, like a one-hit wonder. We really didn't want that. The first time we heard Dido, it felt so appropriate and so perfect to the show. I haven't got sick of it yet, and I think she is very talented, and I am very happy with her success. I think her teaming up with Eminem helped her incredibly. She is a very talented artist. To have her lead the show, it's great.

Dan: Have you ever met her?
Jason Behr: She had come to Los Angeles during the first season and gave a concert. A few of the cast members were able to go, but I was working, and I couldn't be there. I was kind of pissed, because I wanted to be there.

Dan: One of the producers of the show is Jonathan Frakes, who was on "Star Trek: The Next Generation." Did he have any advice for the cast about what it's like to become a sci-fi icon and how to deal with fans?
Jason Behr: Not so much advice on how to deal with fans, but how to deal with the pressure, I guess. Frakes is a great guy and directed a few episodes last year. He is a lot of fun to work with. He has a great personality that is good for the cast and the crew. He is a lot of fun to be around.

Dan: Are you able to give input into scripts?
Jason Behr: Sure, that's one of the nice things about it, you can always give suggestions to Jason for what you believe could be a good character arc, or what you think your character should be doing at this time. It's up to him at the time, [as to] what his character wants to do, but he is very polite.

Dan: Is it fair to say that Max has gotten more burdened by responsibility since the show began?
Jason Behr: Absolutely. I think from the very first show, his world was turned upside down. He was exposing himself to Liz, and the cafe changed his life forever. As the days go on, his responsibility of keeping this all a secret and not being discovered -- I think the discovery of being the supposed king of this so-called planet is a huge responsibility. He never asked for this responsibility and doesn't know how to feel that responsibility. I think he has a lot of pressure on him. He is going through a lot of stuff and has a lot of pressure.

Dan: Well, unfortunately, our time is now up. Jason Behr, it was a pleasure talking to you on AOL. And let's remind everyone to watch "Roswell" tonight and every Monday at 9PM on The WB. Thanks to everyone for their great questions.

Copyright 2001 America Online, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Portions of this transcript may be edited by AOL to correct spelling, punctuation and/or remove any material that violates AOL's Terms of Service.










Behr Bears Roswell
Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2001
From SciFiWire

Roswell star Jason Behr told SCI FI Wire he's got mixed feelings about the show and its fate--a fate that remains uncertain as UPN considers whether or not to move forward with an additional nine episode of the SF series to complete a full 22-episode third season. "Roswell is what helped me get to this point right now," Behr said in an interview, referring to the fact that he's attained status enough to share the screen with Julianne Moore, Kevin Spacey and Scott Glenn in the upcoming film The Shipping News. "I think the character [of Max Evans] was someone who helped me hone my craft. I've learned so much from Roswell, from working [steadily] to trying to develop a character to just the logistics of it. I wouldn't take that away for anything."

On the other hand? "When we first started this, it wasn't a job--it was fun," Behr said. "It was showing up today, working with friends and telling a good story. I felt really positive about everything. I told myself the moment it becomes a job, when it becomes work, it's not worth it anymore for me. There are days [now] when I walk on that set, and I laugh so hard and have such a great time. But there are days when it is work. It can be hard."

If the powers that be cancel Roswell, effective with episode 13, Behr said that hour could be altered to close out the show, as series creator/executive producer Jason Katims has yet to provide the script to his cast. Regardless of whether Roswell ends with episode 13 or episode 22 or even continues for another season, how would Behr like to see Max's arc wrapped up? "I don't know," he replied. "Max dies or, ultimately, I think he would probably stay on Earth." And what about his son? "I would hope he would find him," the actor said. "I would hope so, because he's been working so hard to be that responsible person and live up to his responsibilities. Even though they might be mistakes, he's not trying to run away from them. So I'd hope they'd give him that sort of closure." Roswell airs at 9 p.m. ET/PT Tuesdays on UPN.










Roswell Rocks, Teenmag.com interview
Mini Q&A

Lucky me! I got to hang with Max Evans' alter ego Jason Behr at a party one night for like five whole minutes! (Ok, so it was a press party) Here's what handsome Mr. Behr had to say:

Q: So Jason, do tell...has life totally changed for you? Do you get absolutely mauled when you go out in public now?

A: "Nah... I mean Tom Cruise can't go out even if he's wearing a funny mustache and a big schnoz but for the most part I can just walk around and do as I please. It's my job to be able to blend in y'know?"

Q: I don't know...maybe most people just walk around in a fog 'cause I, for one, would definitely notice you! What about your character? Do you ever wish that Max would lighten up a little?

A: "Yeah, I think that's what we're going to go for this year...we're going to try to balance out the science fiction and the intensity that go with it with relationships and humor. I think it was very important to establish Max and Liz's relationship and the nuances that go along with it. There are so many subtle things that we, as adults, may not remember about first love. When you get involved with someone for the first time and you really, really care about them there's so much more to it than 'Do you wanna go out on a date' and then go to a movie."

Q: Were you cognizant of all the fan sites kids were putting up in an attempt to help "Save Roswell?"

A: "I'm pretty computer stupid but I'm aware of all the support that has come from the fans and nobody expected that sort of response but everyone on the show is really grateful for it."

Q: You guys just came off hiatus...did you work on any cool projects this summer?

A: "No. I didn't really find any scripts that appealed to me. I'd rather take time off and relax than force myself to work on a project I'm not that interested in." Speaking as someone who'd watch him watch the grass grow I'm kinda bummed, but at least we have a new season of "Roswell" to be thankful for!










Jason Behr: the 2nd coming of E.T?
From Ultimate TV
-Conducted by: Amanda Rudolph

He craves Tabasco sauce, not Reese's Pieces. He uses his whole hand to heal wounds, not just a glowing fingertip. He's also tall, dark and handsome, not short, bug-eyed and wrinkly. Still, Max Evans, the teenage alien played by Jason Behr on the WB's new drama Roswell, does share some traits with Steven Spielberg's lovable space creature.

Like E.T., Max is sweet, earnest and sure to warm your heart. But since he and his two space relatives have no idea where they're from, odds are he won't be phoning home anytime soon.

So, how do you prepare to play someone from up there whose background is a mystery? Well, I couldn't go flag down any alien ships and talk to them one-on-one, but I did a lot of research on the history of Roswell, New Mexico. I watched a lot of documentaries, and I actually watched a show called Alien Autopsy with Jonathan Frakes.

Do you have to psyche yourself up for those scenes where Max guzzles Tabasco? I don't mind it so much. But if I ate as much as those guys do, I'd be in the hospital right now.

Did you read the conspiracy books on which the show is based? Yes, but I think we're going to deviate a bit from that. I think the alien and sci-fi aspect is just a backdrop, another way to tell a story of coming of age, self-discovery. I mean, you have the teen alienation, that's all there, but it's also about relationships. The different background allows us to tell a story in a different way.

How do you see Max? He's pretty reserved, kind of a quiet type. Not the sort of thing that comes out of Sigourney Weaver's belly? Right. People have made the E.T. comparison, and in retrospect, I see the similarities. But I wasn't thinking about it when I did the pilot. It wasn't something I tried to rip off.

Are you a fan of the little extraterrestrial? Definitely! It was one of my favorite movies growing up. It was so endearing to see how sweet and sensitive he was. Very different from Battlestar Galactica, which scared the beejeebies out of me. Also, Star Wars--the whole trilogy--was so fascinating, and it had a philosophy and just a way of living. Star Wars is probably one of my favorite movies of all time.

What'd you think of The Phantom Menace? I liked it.

And Jar Jar? Um, The Phantom Menace I liked.

Got it. Now for the million-dollar question: Do you believe in aliens? For me to sit here and say we're the only intelligent life that ever existed would be very presumptuous and somewhat arrogant.







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